Finnerty O'Finnerty Clans of Eire

Finnerty, O'Finnerty Clans of Ireland

Finnertys in Irish History

   

The Finnertys in History section will attempt to provide important events from the Irish Annals which are relevant to our family name.

The Siol Muireadach Finnertys have been selected to lead the group as they are the people [Cinel or Muinter] who are most frequently mentioned in history and because they are identified with Donamon Castle which is still occupied today. Donamon Castle on the River Suck bordering Galway and Roscommon is the epicenter of the largest group of Finnertys in Ireland.  I believe many of these people still inhabit the locales of their ancestors, but believe some are not closely related.  I refer primarily to those related to the O'Conors [Sil Mirry Finnertys] and those related to the O' Kellys [Hy Maine Finnertys]

The Siol Muireadach Finnertys

Siol Muiredaigh Coat of Arms [Basic shield of O'Finerty clans & O'Conor Conacht

 The Siol Muireadach Finaghtys

 Clan Conway Siol Muireadach

The Finnertys of Clan Conway in counties Galway & Rosscommon were often referred to as the Finaghtys of the Valley of the Succa, and their territory was often described at being “about the River Suck.“  The Annals record that these Finnertys of the Siol Muireadhach, descended from Conmhach, the eldest son of  the King of Connaught, Muireadhach Maolleathean who gave his name to this sept which produced the O'Conor Kings of Ireland  and Connacht. 

A notice of this family is given in MacFirbis’ Book of Pedigrees, the literal translation of  it is as follows:

Conmhach was the son of Muireadhach, and he was his eldest son, and in consequence of this seniority, the descendants of Conmhach [though inferior in power] are entitled to great privileges from the descendants of the other sons of Muireadhach, viz., to drink the first cup at every feast and banquet of a king: and all the descendants of the other sons of Muireadhach must rise up before the representative of Conmhach, or Chief of Clann Conway.  O’Finaghty was the royal chieftain of Clann Conway, and had forty-eight ballys about the Suck before the English Invasion; but the Burkes drove him from his patrimonial inheritance, so that there liveth not of the family of O’Finaghty, at the time of writing this Book [1650], any one more illustrious than the blessed and miraculous priest, James, whose brothers are William and Redmond, sons of Cathal, son of Donough, son of Hugh, son of Rory, son of Cathal, son of Teige Oge, son of Teige, son of Cathal.”  Clann Conway in ancient times was thought to be the territory know today as the two half baronies of Ballymoe; East Ballymoe, that portion lying east of the river Suck in the county of Roscommon, and West Ballymoe, that portion lying west of the river Suck in county Galway.   The territory today is referred to as Clan Conway, and has been referred to as: Clanconoo, Clannconon, Clyn Convey, Clyn Convay, Cloinn Connmaigh, &etc.  In the Annals of the Four Masters the name in Irish is usually spelled connmaigh.   In the Annals of Clonmacnoise the translator uses an older phonetic method of spelling , and uses both Clyn Convey, and Clyn Convay.  The genealogy of O’Hart in his Irish Pedigrees uses Conbhach, which would support the translators phonetic use of the English letter [v] in both Convey and Convay.  A map of Hy Maine published in the Tribes and Customs of Hy Many defines only the area west of the Suck River in County Galway as Clann Conmaig.  This is supported by the fact that Ricard-Finn deBurgo, the ancestor of the MacDavid Burkes appears to have only taken territory in West Ballymoe when he was given Clan Conway for his knight's service to King Roderich O'Conor.  It is not likely that Clan Conway, or the two half baronies of Ballymoe were divided between two historical families of the O’Finaghtys who were known as O'Finaghty of Clan Conway and O'Finaghty of Clan Murchada [Murrough] of the Champions.

The two clans were distant cousins  Each of these two O’Finaghtys were  one of the Twelve Great Lords of Rath Cruachain who supported the King of Connacht.  Richard Burke the ancestor of MacDavid Burkes who replaced the aging O’Finaghty, Lord of Clan Conway appears to only have  gained possession of lands in West Ballymoe or he may have lost the east half to Anglo-Norman invaders.  Burke was a lone knight and took possession of  Clan Conway as a gift from King Roderick for his knight’s service.  He married the wife or daughter of  O’Finaghty who was murdered, and the name Finaghty ceased to exist in West Ballymoe.  Nuala na Meadóige Ní Fionnachta, Ní Fionnachta was a member of the Sil Muiredaig (a branch of the Ui Briuin Ai) the royal dynasty of Connacht. She was born and raised at the river ford of Dunamon [Dun Imghain], which had been constructed by her family before 1154 and was the family seat.

Nuala was married or daughter to the lord of the district of Clanconway, but she or her mother murdered him and Nuala married Richard Burke, who seized the lands, including the castles of Dunamon and Glinsk.

One story is: Nuala's son was David Burke (a quo Mac David Burke). Local tradition holds that when attacked by O Connor of Ballintober, David considered retreating until Nuala, seeing his fear, raised up her petticoats and told him Teidh suas a bhfolach uathfa san ait as a dtainig tu. Nuala's derision caused David to stay and fight, and was killed. The Burkes descended from David took the name Mac David Burke.

Among her descendants were those ennobled as the Burke Baronets 

Clan Murchada/Murrogh Finnertys [Siol Muireacach]

After the legal seizure of Clan Conway by Richard Burke, the ancestor of the MacDavid Burkes, the Annals of the Four Masters and other annals only make reference to the O’Finaghtys of  Clan Murrough or Murchada of the Champions who descended from King Inrachtaigh the brother of Conmagh, a quo clan conway. Flann O’Fynaghty was named as the Dux and Chief of the many clans of the Siol Muireadhach [Sil Murry].  Earlier references to O’Finaghty in the “Annals” do not mention the territory of either clan although the notes of the translator sometimes speculate regarding the clan’s location, always noting that Clan Murrogh/Murchada was east of the river Suck.  In the annals these Finaghtys are noted as both clan Murrogh and clan Murchada. The index of the Annals of Loch Ce state: The Clann Murchadha [were the tribe name of the O’Finnachtas seated on the east side of the river Suck in county Roscommon].  Also: the index of the Annals of Loch Ce state under the heading; “Baile-mic-Murchada [Ballymacmurragh, parish of Tibohine, barony of Frenchpark, county of Roscommon].”  translation: the town of the son of Murchad/Murragh.” Murchadh or Murchada was the progenitor of the O'Finnertys of clan Murchada of the champions. 

 Antiquarians have often assigned parts of Ballymoe to clans of both the Sil Murry and Hy Many. These Finnertys descend from  Murchada, son of King Inreachtact the son of King Muireadach Maolleathan. There is also a marriage of a Clan Murrogh Finnerty to the daughter of  Aod {Hugh] a King of Connacht and son of King Roderick of the Yellow Hound.

 King & Saint Finsneachta Luibhne [Siol Muireadach]

 King of Connacht Fionnachta [Saint Finsneachta] Luibhne was the son of Tommaltaig, son of Murgal, son of King Inreachtach son of Muireadach Maolleathan. 

His grandfather King Inreachtach obtained the throne in place of King Muireadach’s eldest son Conmach [ancestor of Finnerty of Clan Conway].   King Innreachtach is also the ancestor of the Clan Conchobhar Finnertys, the Clan Muchada of the Champions Finnertys and of the O’Conor Kings, and of the Mageraghtys and the McDermott Princes of Moylurg.   

 Tomaltaig mac Murgal mac Inreachtach, who appears to never have been King of Connacht, had three sons who were Kings: [1] Muirgius who seems to have shared the32nd kingship with Cinaed mac Artgal [Saint Ardgal] mac Cathal mac Muireadach from 786-792, and shared the 33rd kingship with Colla mac Forggus mac Cellach mac Ragallach [Ragallach was the grandfather of Muireadach M] from 792-796, and Muirgius was the sole king from796-815Muirgius’ brother Diarmait Fionn was the 35th king from 818-833; and his brother Finsnechtae Luibhne [our saint] was the 39th king from 843-848.  Finsneachtae was replaced by a shared kingship between his brother Muirgius’ grandson Conchobar and Mugron of the line of Cathal mac Muireadach M.  The date in the Annals Four Masters differ from the charts:  “The Age of Christ, 846. ....Finsneachta Luibnighew, son of Tomaltach, King of Connaught, and who was afterwards an anchorite, died.  See Finsneachta Luibnighe, also under Saints, in this book.

title

O'Hart of Tara 

From O’Hart’s Irish Pedigrees  Vol. I: 

 

Chapter I, part II page 46:  The Firvolgians ruled over Connaught down to the third century, when King Cormac Mac Art, the 115th Monarch of Ireland, attacked and defeated the forces of Aodh or Hugh, son of Garadh, King of Connaught, who was the last King of the Firbolg race in Ireland; and the soveriegnty of Connaught was then transferred to the Milesians of the race of Heremon-descendants of King Cormac Mac Art.

 

Fionnachtas of the line of Heber, son of Milesius of Spain

of the Province of Munster

 

Chapter I, part II, page 64. Elim Oillfinshneachta, the 136th Monarch of Ireland.  Elim’s father Rotheacta was the first monarch of this stem and the line produced 18 monarchs of the line of Heber, after Elim.  This name is sometimes spelled Eiliomh OllFhionach.

 

O'Carroll & Flanagan of Ely - Maher of Ikerrin

O'Carroll of Ely 

Chapter I part III page 178:  Surname O’Carroll. [No. 1.]  Princes of Ely O’Carroll.

Arms: Sa. two lions ramp. combatant or.  armed and langued gu. supporting a sword, point upwards ppr. pommel and hilt gold.

Cian, the youngest brother of Eoghan [Owen] Mo’r who is No. 85 on the “Line of Hever,” ante, was the ancestor of O’Cearbhaill Ele; anglicised O’Carroll Ely, Karwell, Carvill, Garvill, and MacCarroll. 

85.  Cian: third son of Olioll Olum, King of Munster.

86.  Teige: his son.

87.  Conla: his son; had a brother named Cormac Galeng.

88.  Iomchadh Uallach: his son; whose brother  Finnachta was ancestor of Meagher, and Maher.  Note:  The O’Carrolls seemed to have started in Leinster where some remained, and some migrated to King’s County near Birr and Keenaught co. Derry.  There was an O’Carroll family in barony Magunihy, co. Kerry.

 O'Flanagan Kinelary, Ely O'Carroll

Chapter I part III page 203:  O’Flanagan.  chiefs of Kinelargy,* in Ely O’Carroll.  Arms: Ar. on a mount in base an oak tree ppr. a border vert.

89.  Fec: a brother of Iomdhun who is No. 89 on the “O’Carroll of Ely” pedigree, was the         ancestor of O’Flannagain, Ele; anglicised O’Flanagan, of Ely O’Carroll.

89.  Fec: son of Iomchadh Uallach.

90.  Fionnachtach: his son [ancestor of Flannagan # 96].

 O'Maher Ikerin, Tipperary

Chapter I part III page 237The surname O”Meagher, Chiefs of Ikerin, County Tipperary.  Arms: Az. two lions ramp. combatant or, supporting a sword, in pale.  crest: A falcon rising ppr.

Fionnachta, a younger brother of Iomchadh Uallach, who is No. 88 on the “O’Carroll” Ely pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Meachair: anglicised O’Meagher, Meagher, and Maher.

88.  Fionnachta: second son of Conla.  {ancestor of Meachar who is # 101]

 

Casey of Cork 

Chapter I part III page 79:  The surname Casey.  Arms:  Argent, a chevron between three eagles’ heads erased gu.  Crest: A hand fess ways issuing from a cloud.  Motto; Per varios casus.  CORMAC, a brother of Conla, who is No. 87 on the “O’Carroll Ely” pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Cathasaigh, I.e., Na Saithne; anglicized Casey[1].

87.  Cormac: son of Tadhg [or Teige].

88.  Gailineach: his son; a quo O’Gailineigh, anglicized Galinagh.

89.  Glasaradh: his son.

90.  Faghad: his son.

91.  Ionrosa: his son.

92.  Beag: his son.

93.  Brogan: his son

94.  Fionnachtach:  his son.  The first Casey was Cathasach, a quo O’Cathasaigh;       number 101.

 

title

 Loughnan coat of arms Loughnan family crest O'Loughnan of Ely O'Carroll

Chapter I part III page 101:  The surname Loughnan.    Arms: Vert a exter hand couped apaume’e  and in chief an arrow fessways ar.  Crest: A castle triple-towered ppr.  Fionnachtach, a brother of Iomchadh Uallach who is No. 88 on the “O’Carrol Ely” pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Lachtnain Ele; anglicised O’Loughnan, and Loughnan, of Ely O’Carroll, and modernised Loftus.  These are of the race of Heber, son of Milesius.

 

 

MacNamara and Sheedy of Clare

   MacNamara No.1 of Bunratty, Clare 

Chapter I part III page 260:  This family [Sheedy] descends from Sioda, *, a younger brother of John an Ghabhaltuis [Conqueror], who is No. 117 on the “MacNamara” genealogy: that Sioda who was the ancestor of “MacNamara Fionn.” See footnote.  MacNamara. [No. 1.] were Lords of Bunratty, County Clare.  Bunratty Castle is located just a few miles south of Kilfinaghty which is located near Sixmile Bridge.  The MacNamaras were of the same stock as the O’Brians and Kennedys, Kings of Thomond. 

 O' Finaghty of Clan Conway

 Chapter IV part III page 448:  Under the surname Fihilly.  Muredach Maolleathan, the 16th Christian King of Connaught, who is No. 97 on the “O’Connor” [Connaught] pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Ficheallaigh; anglicised Fihilly, Feely, Field, Fielden, Fielding, Tooth, Ol’Feely, and Pickley.  This Ficheallach had a brother named Cahernach, who was the ancestor of Canavan, of Connaught; and another brother named Dungar, who was the father of Finaghty of Clan Conway.  Note: Dungar was also known as Donn Garadh; Garadh, as noted above was the last Firbolg King of Conacht. There is also a place named Dun Garadh in county Roscommon.

 

Chapter IV part III page 449:  Under the surname Finaghty.  Arms: Ar. an oak tree eradicated ppr.  Dungar, a brother of Ficheallach, who is No. 99 on the “Fihilly” pedigree, was ancestor of O’finachtaigh; anglicised Finaghty, Finnerty, and Snow.

99.       Dungar: son of Conbhach.

100.     Fionnachtach [“fionnsneachda:”  Irish, snow-white]: son of Dungar; a quo O’Finachtaigh, “one of the twelve lords of Cruaghan” (or Croaghan) in the county  Roscommon.

 

Coat of Arms 

Fionnachtach [ancestor of Donnellan, Lords of Massarene].

Chapter IV part III page 452:  Under the surname Flinn.  Lords of Tuirtre, or Northern Clanaboy.  Fiacra Tort [son of Colla Uaais], a brother of Roghan, who is No. 86 on the “Mac Uais” pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Flainn, of Tuirtre; anglicised O’Flinn, Flinn, Linn, Lyne, etc.  Clannaboy is comprised of the present day baronies of Toome and Antrim in N. Ireland. 

86.  Fiachra Tort: son of Colla Uais; a quo O’Tuairtre.

90.  Cuanach son of Daire was King of Orgiall, as were seven of his posterity.

Bec: his son; King of Orgiall; a quo Cineal Beice.

92.  Fuadhran: his son; King of Orgiall; wnf4e6o5 ot Casey and Dubhghala [Dougall?].

93.  Suibhneach: his son; King of Orgiall.

97.  Inrachtach son of Reachtabrad; had a brother Fionnachtach [ancestor of Donnellan, Lords of Massarene].

 

Chapter IV part III page 487:  .Under the surname Hoolahan. [No. 3.]  Chiefs of Siol Anmchada in Hy-Maine.  arms: Az. a tower or, supported by two lions ramp. ar. in base two crescents of the last, on a chief of the third three annulets gu. Some say the clan was not of the Hy Maine [Kelly/Madden], but descended from the high kings of Munster, while others say the Kings of Leinster. Their basic coat of arms is the same as O'Kelly of Hy Many [clan Colla]

  Flanchadh [Flancha], brother of Cobthach who is No. 100 on the “O’Madden” [of Connaught] pedigree, was the ancestor of O’h-Uallachain; anglicised O’Hoolahan, Hoolahan, Oulahan, etc.  It is recorded that the O'Uallachains were Lords in Lusmagh a part of Connacht lying on the east side of the Shannon River near Clonmacnoise Monastery.

100.  Flanchadh: son of Maoldun [or Maoldubhan].

101.  Flann: his son.

102.  Uallachan his son; a quo O’h-Uallachain.

Fourteen generations:

117.  Fionnachtach: son of Umhan.

 Genealogy of King Finnachtach Fleadhach follows:

The ancestry of this Monarch of the Southern Hy Niall descends from the Monarch Aed Slaine a King of Meath.  King Finnerty was at constant war with his distant cousins who eventually killed him and his heir.  His only known descendant are the Moodys of Meath and surrounding country. The Fogartys of Tipperary appear to be his closest cousins. 

Chapter IV part III page 592.  Under the surname Moody.  Arms: Az. a chev. erm. betw. three pheons ar.  [a pheon is a spear head]. Most internet sites selling family name plaques show a similar coat of arms, however, the three pheons have been replaced with three pheon shaped flowers.

 Fogarty coat of arms Fogarty family crestFogarty Lords of Eliogarty, Tipperary

DONOCH, brother of Dermod Ruanach who is No. 92 on the “:Fogarty” pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Maolmodha; anglicised Mulmuog, Mulmody, Moody, and Mulmy.

88.  Conall Crimthann: son of Niall Mo’r or Niall of the Nine Hostages, the 126th Monarch of Ireland; was the first Christian King of Meath. [Fogarty pedigree]

89.  Fergus Cearbhall, his son.

90.  Diarmaid [Dermod]: his son; the 5th Christian King, and 133rd Monarch of Ireland.  Was slain at the battle of Rathbegg, by Hugh Dubh MacSweeney, King of Dalaraidia, A.D. 558.  In Dermod’s reign the Royal Palace was deserted.

91.  Aodh [Hugh] Slaine: son of Dermod; the 141st Monarch.

92.  Donoch: son of Aidus [or Aodh] Slaine the 141st  Monarch of Ireland.  [Moody pedigree]

93.  Finachtach Fleadhach:  his son who was the 153rd Monarch.

 

Chapter IV part III page 601:  Under the surname Mulrennan.  The pedigree states that the 18th Christian King of Connaught, Cathal mac Muireadach Maoilleathan is the ancestor of Finnerty and Finaghty. 

This is incorrect as O’Hart states elsewhere that Finnerty Clan Conway is descended from Conmach mac Muireadach, who was a brother of this Cathal.   The Finnertys of clan Murrow descend from Inreachtach this Cathals brother, and another Finnerty descends from Conor or Conchobhar another brother.

 Chapter IV part III page 649:  Under the surname O’Donell. [no. 6.]  Lords of Clankelly.  Arms: same as O’Hart [no. 1.]

 DONALL, who is No. 99 on the O’Hart pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Domhnaill, of Clankelly, in the county of Fermanagh; also anglicised MacDonnell, MacDonald, Daniel, and MacDaniel.

99.  Donall: son of Colga: a quo O’Domhnaill.

100.  Art: his son.

101.  Fionnachtach:  his son.

 

Chapter IV part III page 664.  Under the surname O’Hart. [No. 1.]  Princes of Tara, and Chiefs in Sligo.  Arms: Gu. a lion passanat guardfant or, in base a human heart argent.

ART EANFHEAR, who [see page 359] is No. 81 on the “Line of Heremon,” and son of the Monarch Conn of the Hundred Battles, was the ancestor of this family:

81.  Art Eanfhear the 112th Monarch of Ireland son of Conn.

82.  Cormac Ulfhada: son of Art was the 115th Monarch of Ireland.

83.  Cairbre-Lifeachar, the 117th Monarch of Ireland: his son.

84.  Eochaidh Dubhlen, the eldest son of Cairbre had a brother Fiacha Srabhteine, who             was the 120th Monarch.  Eochaid was married to alechia, dau. of Updar, King of             Alba,and by her had three sons, who were known as the “Three Collas.

85.  Colla da Chrioch [ or Facrioch] meaning two countries, Ireland and Alba.  Founder of        the Kingdom of Orgiall.

86.  Rochadh: son of Colla da Crioch.  Had a borther Imchadh who was ancestor to the            Hy Maine of Connaught.

Thirteen generations:

100.  Fionnachtach, son of Donall chiefs of Clann Kelly.  From this Fionnachtach descended O’Hart; andCairn, Cairns, Flanagan, Donnellan, Kearns, etc., all of Ulster.

 

 

 O'Kelly Kings of Hy Maine [Roscommon-Galway]

 

Chapter IV part III page 684.  Under the surname O’Kelly. [No. 1.] Kings of Hy-Maine.  Arms: Azure. a tower triple-towered supported by two lions ramp. Argent,. as many chains descending from the battlements betw. the lion’s legs orgiall.

IOMCHADH, The second son of Colla da Chrioch, who is No. 85 on the [No. 1] O’Hart [Princes of Tara] pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Cellaigh, Princes of Hy-Maine [ in the counties of Galway and Roscommon], Anglicised O’Kelly, Kalloch, Kellogg, and Kelly.

86.  Imchadah: son of Colla-da-Chrioch.

87.  Domhnall: his son.

88.  Eochaidh: his son.

89.  Main M'or: his son: a quo the territory of Hy-Maine

Six generations from Main M'or to Eoghan Fionn:

96.  Eoghan Fionn: son of Cormac.  Eoghan had a younger brother named Eoghan [Owen] Buac, who was ancestor of Madden, Clancy, Tracey, Hannan, Kenny, Hoolahan, and the Ua Finnachtaigh of the Sil Anmchada]

Three generations from Eoghan Fionn to Inreachtach

100.  Inreachtach, son of Fiacalach.  Had a brother Coscrach [Coskry].

101.  Olioll [Ailell], son of Inreachtach.

102.  Fionnachtach: his son.

103.  Ceallach: his son; a quo O’Cealliagh, of Hy-Maine, A.D 874.  Grandfather of Teige: Catha Briuin, meaning Teige who fell in Brian’s Battle [of Clontarf] where the Danes were beaten at Dublin [Clontarf] in A.D. 1014.

 

 

Chapter IV part III page 718:  Under the surname O’Neill. [No.2.]  Princes of Tyrone.

Niall Ruadh O’Neill, son of Aodh was Prince of Ulster, and was married to Nuala [died 1226], daughter of Roderic O’Connor, the 183rd Monarch of Ireland.  Niall’s father was styled: Lord of Tirowen, King of Aileach, etc.

 

Chapter IV part III page 786.  Under the heading: “Monarchs of the Line of Heremon.”

 

67.  Diarmid: son of Feargus Ceirbheoil, son of Conal Creamthann, son of Niall Mo’r.

75.  Aodh Slaine: son of Diarmuid, son of Feargus Ceirbheol, son of Conal Crimthann, son of Niall Mo’r [No. 61].

87.  Finachta Fleadhach: son of Dunchada, son of Aodh Slaine.

 Part VI page 845:  THE ANCIENT KINGDOM OF CONNAUGHT.

 Part VI chapter 2 page 851: --ROSCOMMON AND GALWAY.

 [a] The Irish Chief and Clans. : as collected from O’Dugan’s Topograhy and other sources:

Part VI page 852 para. 4.  O’Fionnachta or O’Finaghty, chiefs of Clan Conmaig, and of Clan Murchada, district in the two half baronies of Ballymoe in the couunties of Galway and Roscommon, in O’Kelly’s principality of Hy Maine.  The O’Finaghtys here mentioned were of the Clan Colla; and two distinct chiefs of them are given by O’Dugan: one of them, Finaghty of “Clan Murrough of the Champions:”  The other, Finaghty of the “Clan Conway.”  O’Finaghty [modernized Finnerty], chiefs of Clan Conway, had their castle at Dunamon, near the river Suck, in the county Roscommon..  It is stated in some old authorities, that the O’Finaghtys had the privilege of drinking the first cup at every royal feast. 

            Note:  Donnellan in his Four Masters says the O’Finaghtys “as a head branch of the Siol Murry, had the privilege of drinking the first cup at every royal feast.  Donnellan is correct, these Finnertys were kin to the O'Conors.  The O'Finaghtys of Clan Conmaig were not Clan Colla or related to the O'Kellys.

 Concannon coat of arms Concannon family crest

Part VI page 852 para. 13:.  O’Conceannain or O’Concannon, chiefs of Hy-Diarmada, a district on the borders of Roscommon and Galway, in the baronies of Athlone and Ballymoe.  They are Sil Murry, descending from Indeachtrach, as do the O’Conors of Connacht.  They are of the line of Dermod Fionn the brother of Muirgius and Finsnechtae Luibhne.

            Donnellan’s Four Masters has a map which shows the names “Fihilly” and “Concannon” just south of East Ballymoe and opposite West Ballymoe on the River Suck.  Fihelly was a brother to Dungar the ancestor of Finnerty [Clann Conway].


 

 w Finsneachta Luibnighe: i.e. Finsneachta of Luibneach, a place on the borders of ancient Meath and Munster, where it is problable he was fostered.-see Book of Lecan, fol.260, b, and Leabhar-na-gCeart, p. 10 note u.  “AD 847. nix magna [great snow] in Kal. Februarii, Finsnechta Luibnighi, Ancorita, et Rex Connacht antea [before], mortuus est [he died].”--Ann. Ult.

[1]  Casey:  The patrimony of this family was at Coiltemabhreenagh, in the parish of Mitchelstown, barony of Brigown, and county of Cork.

* Kinelargy:  This ancient territory corresponds with the present barony of Ballybrit, in the King’s County.

* Sioda: According to a desription of County Clare [ situate in the W. part of that ccounty] this territory, MacNamara Fionn,” comprised the parish of Kilfinaghty.

 

 

 

O'Hart continued to page 40

descended the Ulster families of Carolan, Donnellan, and Flanagan.

Chapter IV part III page 419 Under the surname Donnellan. [No. 2.] Lords of Massarene. Finachtach, brother of Inrachtach who is No. 97 on the "Flin" of North Clanaboy pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Donnellan, of Orgiall.

97. Finachtach son of Rachtabrad. Ancestor of O'Donellan and O'Craoibhe of Ulster; anglicized Creagh, Creaghe, and Crabbe.

Chapter IV part III page 448 Under the surname Fihilly. Muredach Maolleathan, the 16th Christian King of Connaught, who is No. 97 on the "O'Connor" [Connaught] pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Ficheallaigh; anglicised Fihilly, Feely, Field, Fielden, Fielding, Tooth, Ol'Feely, and Pickley. This Ficheallach had a brother named Cahernach, who was the ancestor of Canavan, of Connaught; and another brother named Dungar, who was the ancestor of Finaghty.

Chapter IV part III page 449 Under the surname Finaghty. Arms Ar. an oak tree eradicated ppr.

Dungar, a brother of Ficheallach, who is No. 99 on the "Fihilly" pedigree, was ancestor of O'finachtaigh; anglicised Finaghty, Finnerty, and Snow.

99. Dungar son of Conbhach.

100. Fionnachtach ["fionnsneachda" Irish, snow-white] son of Dungar; a quo O'Finachtaigh, "one of the twelve lords of Cruaghan" (or Croaghan) in the county Roscommon.

Chapter IV part III page 452 Under the surname Flinn. Lords of Tuirtre, or Northern Clanaboy. Fiacra Tort [son of Colla Uaais], a brother of Roghan, who is No. 86 on the "Mac Uais" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Flainn, of Tuirtre; anglicised O'Flinn, Flinn, Linn, Lyne, etc. Clannaboy is comprised of the present day baronies of Toome and Antrim

86. Fiachra Tort son of Colla Uais; a quo O'Tuairtre.

90. Cuanach son of Daire was King of Orgiall, as were seven of his posterity.

Bec his son; King of Orgiall; a quo Cineal Beice.

92. Fuadhran his son; King of Orgiall; wnf4e6o5 ot Casey and Dubhghala [Dougall?].

93. Suibhneach his son; King of Orgiall.

97. Inrachtach son of Reachtabrad; had a brother Fionnachtach [ancestor of Donnellan, Lords of Massarene].

Chapter IV part III page 487 .Under the surname Hoolahan. [No. 3.] Chiefs of Siol Anmchada in Hy-Maine. arms Az. a tower or, supported by two lions ramp. ar. in base two crescents of the last, on a chief of the third three annulets gu.

Flanchadh [Flancha], brother of Cobthach who is No. 100 on the "O'Madden" [of Connaught] pedigree, was the ancestor of O'h-Uallachain; anglicised O'Hoolahan, Hoolahan, Oulahan, etc.

100. Flanchadh son of Maoldun [or Maoldubhan].

101. Flann his son.

102. Uallachan his son; a quo O'h-Uallachain.

Fourteen generations

117. Fionnachtach son of Umhan.

Chapter IV part III page 592. Under the surname Moody. Arms Az. a chev. erm. betw. three pheons ar.

DONOCH, brother of Dermod Ruanach who is No. 92 on the "Fogarty" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Maolmodha; anglicised Mulmuog, Mulmody, Moody, and Mulmy.

88. Conall Crimthann son of Niall Mo'r or Niall of the Nine Hostages, the 126th Monarch of Ireland; was the first Christian King of Meath. [Fogarty pedigree]

89. Fergus Cearbhall, his son.

90. Diarmaid [Dermod] his son; the 5th Christian King, and 133rd Monarch of Ireland. Was slain at the battle of Rathbegg, by Hugh Dubh MacSweeney, King of Dalaraidia, A.D. 558. In Dermod's reign the Royal Palace was deserted.

91. Aodh [Hugh] Slaine son of Dermod; the 141st Monarch.

92. Donoch son of Aidus [or Aodh] Slaine the 141st Monarch of Ireland. [Moody pedigree]

93. Finachtach Fleadhach his son who was the 153rd Monarch.

Chapter IV part III page 601 Under the surname Mulrennan. The pedigree states that the 18th Christian King of Connaught, Cathal mac Muireadach Maoilleathan is the ancestor of Finnerty and Finaghty. This may be incorrect as O'Hart states elsewhere that Finnerty is descended from Conmach mac Muireadach [clan Conway], who was a brother of this Cathal. There wer other Finnertys in the Sil Murry.

Chapter IV part III page 649 Under the surname O'Donell. [no. 6.] Lords of Clankelly. Arms same as O'Hart [no. 1.]

DONALL, who is No. 99 on the O'Hart pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Domhnaill, of Clankelly, in the county of Fermanagh; also anglicised MacDonnell, MacDonald, Daniel, and MacDaniel.

99. Donall son of Colga a quo O'Domhnaill.

100. Art his son.

101. Fionnachtach his son.

Chapter IV part III page 664. Under the surname O'Hart. [No. 1.] Princes of Tara, and Chiefs in Sligo. Arms Gu. a lion passanat guardfant or, in base a human heart argent.

ART EANFHEAR, who [see page 359] is No. 81 on the "Line of Heremon," and son of the Monarch Conn of the Hundred Battles, was the ancestor of this family

81. Art Eanfhear the 112th Monarch of Ireland son of Conn.

82. Cormac Ulfhada son of Art was the 115th Monarch of Ireland.

83. Cairbre-Lifeachar, the 117th Monarch of Ireland his son.

84. Eochaidh Dubhlen, the eldest son of Cairbre had a brother Fiacha Srabhteine, who was the 120th Monarch. Eochaid was married to alechia, dau. of Updar, King of Alba,and by her had three sons, who were known as the "Three Collas.

85. Colla da Chrioch [ or Facrioch] meaning two countries, Ireland and Alba. Founder of the Kingdom of Orgiall.

86. Rochadh son of Colla da Crioch. Had a borther Imchadh who was ancestor to the Hy Maine of Connaught.

Thirteen generations

100. Fionnachtach, son of Donall chiefs of Clann Kelly. From this Fionnachtach descended O'Hart; andCairn, Cairns, Flanagan, Donnellan, Kearns, etc., all of Ulster.

Chapter IV part III page 684. Under the surname O'Kelly. [No. 1.] Princes of Hy-Maine. Arms Azure. a tower triple-towered supported by two lions ramp. Argent,. as many chains descending from the battlements betw. the lion's legs orgiall.

IOMCHADH, The second son of Colla da Chrioch, who is No. 85 on the [No. 1] O'Hart [Princes of Tara] pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Cellaigh, Princes of Hy-Maine [ in the counties of Galway and Roscommon], Anglicised O'Kelly, Kalloch, Kellogg, and Kelly.

86. Imchadah son of Colla-da-Chrioch.

87. Domhnall his son.

88. Eochaidh his son.

89. Main Mo'r his son a quo the territory of Hy-Maine

Six generations

96. Eoghan Fionn son of Cormac. Had a younger brother named Eoghan [Owen] Buac, who was ancestor of Madden, Clancy, Tracey, Hannan, Kenny, Hoolahan, etc. [Ua Finnachtaigh of the Sil Anmchada]

Three generations

100. Inreachtach, son of Fiacalach. Had a brother Coscrach [Coskry].

101. Olioll [Ailell], his son.

102. Fionnachtach his son.

103. Ceallach his son; a quo O'Cealliagh, of Hy-Maine, A.D 874. Grandfather of Teige Catha Briuin, meaning Teige who fell in Brian's Battle [of Clontarf] where the Danes were beaten at Dublin [Clontarf] in A.D. 1014.

Chapter IV part III page 718 Under the surname O'Neill. [No.2.] Princes of Tyrone.

Niall Ruadh O'Neill, son of Aodh was Prince of Ulster, and was married to Nuala [died 1226], daughter of Roderic O'Connor, the 183rd Monarch of Ireland. Niall's father was styled Lord of Tirowen, King of Aileach, etc.

 

Fionnachtas line of Ir, son of Milesius of Spain

            Ir was a chief leader of the expedition from Spain.  He perished in a storm when his ship was separated from the rest of the fleet off of Skellig-Mhicheal off the Kerry coast in Munster.  Ir’s son Heber Donn was granted possession of what is now called Ulster, however it appears they ruled from Rath Cruachan in Roscommon.  This was the race of Fergus MacRoy, Connor MacNessa, and the Red Branch Knights.

 Chapter III part III page  300:  According to some chroniclers, “Ulster” was first called Uladh, from Ollamn Fodhla.  His posterity maintained themselves in the Monarchy of Ireland for 250 years, without any of the two other septs of Heber and Heremon intercepting them.  He died at an advanced age, A.M. 3922, at his own Mur [or house] at Tara, leaving five sons, viz.: 1. Slanoll; 2. Finachta Fionnsneachta [ or Elim]; 3.  Gead Ollghothach, and 4.  Fiacha, who were successively Monarchs of Ireland; and 5.  Cairbre.

 Chapter III part III page 350:  The Irian Monarchs of Ireland.

 5.  Eochaidh [Ollamh Fodhla]: son of Fiacha Fionn-Sciothach, son of Seidnae, son of                Airtri, son of Eibhric, son of Heber Donn, son of Ir, son of Milesius.

6.  Finachta Fionn-sneachta: son of Eochaidh.

9.  Fiacha: son of Finachta Fionn-sneachta.

 

Fionnachtas of the line of Heremon, son of Milesius of Spain

             Heremon was the seventh son of Milesius, but the third of the three sons who left issue.  From Heremon were descended the Kings of Connaught, Dalriada, Leinster, Meath, Orgiall, Ossory; of Scotland since the fifth century; of Ulster since the fourth century; and of England from the reign of King Henry II down to present time.

Chapter IV part III page 358:   It was this Monarch [ Tuathal Teachtmar, 106th] that imposed the great and insupportable fine [or Eric] of ................. to be paid every second year by the province of Leinster to the Monarchs of Ireland for ever, for the death of his only two daughters Fithir and Darina.  This tribute was punctually taken and exacted, sometimes by fire and sword, during the reigns of forty Monarchs of Ireland upwards of six hundred years, until at last remitted by Finachta Fleadhach, the 153rd Monarch of Ireland, and the 26th Christian Monarch, at the request and earnest solicitation of St. Moling.

 Foghartach Ulster

Chapter IV part III page 374:  Under the surname Cairns.   Finachtach [fionn-sneachta: Iris, “fair as snow,”]  who is No. 100 on the “O’Hart” pedigree, had three sons--1. Art,  2.  Conmaol,  and 3.  Foghartach:  This Forgharthach, was the ancestor of O’Cairn, Cairn, MacCairn, Cairnes, Cairns, Kearin, Kearins, Kearn, Kerans, Kerin, Kieran, etc.  From the said Fogharthach are also descended the Ulster families of Carolan, Donnellan, and Flanagan.

 

Chapter IV part III page 419:  Under the surname Donnellan. [No. 2.]  Lords of Massarene. Arms: Ar. a dexter arm couped between two swords in pale all ppr.  Finachtach, brother of Inrachtach who is No. 97 on the “Flin” of North Clanaboy pedigree, was the ancestor of O’Donnellan, of Orgiall.

97Finachtach son of Rachtabrad.  Ancestor of O’Donellan and O’Craoibhe of Ulster; anglicized Creagh, Creaghe, and Crabbe.

 

 

O'Hart 40 to 42

Chapter IV part III page 786. Under the heading "Monarchs of the Line of Heremon."

 

 

67. Diarmid son of Feargus Ceirbheoil, son of Conal Creamthann, son of Niall Mo'r.

75. Aodh Slaine son of Diarmuid, son of Feargus Ceirbheol, son of Conal Crimthann, son of Niall Mo'r [No. 61].

87. Finachta Fleadhach son of Dunchada, son of Aodh Slaine.

Part VI page 845 THE ANCIENT KINGDOM OF CONNAUGHT.

Part VI chapter 2 page 851 --ROSCOMMON AND GALWAY.

[a] The Irish Chief and Clans. as collected from O'Dugan's Topograhy and other sources

 

Part VI page 852 para. 4. O'Fionnachta or O'Finaghty, chiefs of Clan Conmaig, and of Clan Murchada, district in the two half baronies of Ballymoe in the couunties of Galway and Roscommon, in O'Kelly's principality of Hy Maine. The O'Finaghtys here mentioned were of the Clan Colla; and two distinct chiefs of them are given by O'Dugan one of them, Finaghty of "Clan Murrough of the Champions" The other, Finaghty of the "Clan Conway." O'Finaghty [modernized Finnerty], chiefs of Clan Conway, had their castle at Dunamon, near the river Suck, in the county Roscommon.. It is stated in some old authorities, that the O'Finaghtys had the privilege of drinking the first cup at every royal feast.

Note Donnellan in his Four Masters says the O'Finaghtys "as a head branch of the Siol Murry, had the privilege of drinking the first cup at every royal feast. I believe Donnellan is correct.

Part VI page 852 para. 13. O'Conceannain or O'Concannon, chiefs of Hy-Diarmada, a district on the borders of Roscommon and Galway, in the baronies of Athlone and Ballymoe. They are Sil Murry, descending from Indeachtrach, as do the O'Conors of Connacht. They are of the line of Dermod Fionn the brother of Muirgius and Finsnechtae Luibhne.

Donnellan's Four Masters has a map which shows the names "Fihilly" and "Concannon" just south of East Ballymoe and opposite West Ballymoe on the River Suck. Fihelly was a brother to Dungar the ancestor of Finnerty [Clann Conway].

14. MacMurchada, MacMurrough or Murphy, chiefs of Tomaltaigh in Roscommon, of which MacOiraghta was head chief.

Prior to the Gerraghtys, the Chieftains of the Sil Murry were the Finnertys of Clann Murchada.

From O'Hart's Irish Pedigrees Vol. I

 

CHAPTER IV. The Line of Heremon PAGE 762, O'TOOLE PEDIGREE.

#104. Bran Ardcean [King of Leinster, descendant of Muireadach of Cualan] married Eithne, dau. of Domhnal Mideach; she and her husband were slain, A.D.780, by FINACHDA CATHERDERE, son of Ceallach, at Cill Cuile-duna [now Kilcoole], near Newtown Mount Kennedy, in the co. Wicklow.

From O'Hart's Irish Pedigrees Vol. II

APPENDIX NO. I PAGE 713 paragraph 100.--Provincial Kings of Ireland.

1.--The Kings of Connaught. Since the Advent of St. Patrick to Ireland, A.D, 432.

Fionnachta Luibhne, the 33rd Christian King of Connaught [A.D. 843-848].

APPENDIX NO. I PAGE 714. paragraph 100.--provincial Kings of Ireland.

2.--The Kings of Leinster.

Fionnachtach, the 25th Christian King of Leinster. [Note Finsnechtsa Cetharderc, mac Ceallaig, [at] hi Cill Chuiille-dumai killed his predecessor Bran Airdcheann in A.D. 794 ot 790, or 795 at Kilcoole near Newtown Mount Kennedy in co. Wicklow. His father Ceallach was the 22nd king.

 

According to Donnellan's "Four Masters" or [D'Alton] O'Donovan's Four Masters are treated separately.

[in AD 1176 I quote] "Roderick O'Conor, King of Ireland, granted a Bally Dintach [townland] to God and St. Bearraidh forever, namely, Tuaim Achaidh. The witnesses for confirming this grant by O'Conor and his successors forever were, Cadhla O'Duffy, archbishop of Tuaim, Airchteach O'Roduibh [Rody], Flann O'Fionachta [Feenaghty,] Hugh O'Floinn, Ruairc O'Maoilbrenainn, Ingaidhe [Ignatius] O'Manachain, Giollu-an- Coimde Mac Anlestair, [MacAllister] O'Hainlidhe [O'Hanly,] and Conor Mac Dermott.." Note]. This Flann O'Fionachta was the Chief of the Sil Murry and of the Clan Murchada. Saint Bearach founded a monastery in Killbarry [parish/townland]. This is Termonbarry Parish in North County Roscommon, on the Shannon River. St. Berach was the patron of Cluain Cairpthe [Clooncorpey].

[in AD 1189 I quote] "O'Conor, of Maonmoy, [son of Roderick,], king of Connaught over both Irish and English, was slain by a party of his own people, namely, by Manus, son of Floinn O'Finachta [who was called the Crosach Donn5], aided by Hugh, son of Bryan of Brefney, son of Torlogh O'Conor; Murtogh, son of Cathal, son of Dermod, son of Teige; and Giolla-na-namh, son of Giollacomain, son of Muireadhach Ban [the fair] O'Maoilmichil of the Tuatha." COMMENT The note "5" explains that the sobriquet Crosach Donn means " the brown haired squinter." O"Donovan's Four Masters, however, claims the word "crosac" means, streaked, seamed, or marked with crosses, and was probably applied from having had the "ciactices, or seams of wounds intersecting each other on his face. This was the case with Shane Crosach O'Mullen a celebrated Londonderry Highwayman who flourished a hundred years later.

 

[in AD 1194 I quote] "Sitruig, son of Floinn O'Feenaghty, chief of Clan Murchadha,3 died." COMMENT Note 3 states " O;Finnaghta was chief of Clan Murchada, a district in the county of Roscommon.

 

 

Annals of Boyle

  

From the Annals of Boyle [D'Alton]

 

[1156] The supreme sovereignty [of Ireland] passed to Murtough O'Loughlin, while Roderick, the son of Turlough, succeeded to the government of Conaught. His first act was to possess himself of the persons of his three brothers, respectively styled, "Brian of Brefny, Brian of Luigne, and Murtough of Munster,"when by his order, "Brian, of Brefny, was deprived of his sight.

[In AD 1184 I quote] "Brian of Brefny, son of Flan, son of Finnachta, chief of the Clan Murchad, dies." Note Re-checked for accuracy. Strange that both Turlough mor and Flan Finnachta should have a son with this name, and both involved in the death of Conor Moinmoy [heir apparent] the son of Roderick the Monarch of Ireland and King of Connacht.

 

"The supporters of Roderick's sons now held a council, and resolved that they should return home, which all agreed to do except Donogh Oge Mac Airechtach. the other chiefs, however, having parted from the royal sons of Roderic O'Conor, with whom they left but a small force, proceeded to the residence of Hugh O'Neill , accompanied by Donogh Mac Airechtach."

Annals of Loch C'e

 

 

Annals of Connacht [Freeman]

 

and

The Annals of Connacht [Freeman]

 

[1224] The Annals of Connacht begin with the death of Cathal Crobderg son of Toirrdelbach O Conchobair, king of Connacht.

[AD 1232.5] The castle of Bun Gaillme was built by Richard Burke and the castle of Dunamon was begun by Adam Staunton.

[1225.4/10/12/16/25/30/31] A great rebellion was raised by Toirrdelbach and Aed, son of Ruaidri [O'Conchobair], and Aed O Neill, to wrest the kingship of the province from Aed mac Cathail Chrobdeirg. This was done at the instance of Donn Oc MacAirechtaig, royal chieftain of Sil Murray, who wished to revenge himself for the confiscation of his land and patrimony1 ; and when he revolted the whole of Connacht revolted-Sil Murray and West Connacht with Aed O Flaithbertaig its king-excepting only Mac Diarmata, Cormac son of Tomaltach.

And

It was at this time that the Galls approached Toirrdelbach son of Ruaidri. He rose up with his chieftains, and putting their rabble in front they escaped beautifully, not one of themselves being killed; for Donn Oc Mac Airechtaig, Flaithbertach O Flannacan and a small number of the forces of Cenel Eogain covered their rear.

And

The son of Cathal Crobhderg and the Galls intending to plunder the Tuatha of Sil Murray and Clan Tomaltaigh went from Mellick by way of Fid Gatlaig to Attymas where they plundered Coolcarney. All who went to Ballycong were drowned, and some of the refugees of Clann Tomaltaig who escaped drowning went into Tirawley, where O'Dubda fell upon them and left them without a single cow. Note In the index it says that Clann Tomaltaig was a territory between Ballintober and Tulsk, Co. Roscommon.

 

And

Cathal Crobderg's son with his Galls went to Tuaim, where he dismissed the Leinster and Desmond Galls, reserving to himself the task of escorting the Justiciar past Athlone. Then he took another decision, to turn back towards O Flaithbertaig; for he mistrusted the situation in which he had left him, having Ruaidri's sons with him to the west of the Lake [thought to be Lough Corrib] and his [Flahert's]own son-in-law, Donn Oc [Gerrity] as well.

And

Next day Ruaidri's sons met with O Flaithbertaig and the sons of Muirchertach and Tigernan son of Cathal [Micuran O Conchobair] and Donn Oc, and they all proceeded northwards to Druim Cenannain. But then Aed mac Cathail Chrobdeirg with his Galls came after them, and they decided that each one should return to his cattle and people and leave the sons of Ruaidri. Ruaidri's sons departed out of the country, having no Galls or other following at hand, and together with Donn Oc they once more sought the protection of Aed O Neill. Note King of Ulad, O Neill's wife was the daughter of Ruaidri O'Conor the Monarch.

And

Tadc O Finnachta*, an officer of Aed son of Ruaidri [O Conchotair] was killed by Mac Aedacan's men on a plundering raid in this same war. Note* says O'Finnachta, was O'Conchobair's doorkeeper [Inaug.].

And

Muiredach O Finnachta, chieftain of Clann Murthaile*, died in a boat on Loch Corrib, though in good health when he entered it. Note * says Murchada is right word. Index says Clann Murchada, in S. Roscommon.

[1226.6] Nuala daughter of Ruaidri O Conchobair, queen of the Ulaid, died at Cong and was buried with great honour in the Canons' church there.

[1230.2/5/6/7/8] Aed son of Ruaidri [O Conchobair] and the men of Connacht turned against Mac William Burke and the Galls of Ireland, being persuaded thereto by Donn Oc son of Donnchatha Mac Airechtaig and Cormac Mac Diarmata and his officers, who all vowed they would never own a lord who should bring them to make submission to the Galls. They made then great raids on the Galls, Aed son of Ruaidri and the men of West Connacht plundering the young son of William [brother of Richard] and Adam Duff, while Donn Oc and the sons of Magnus [son of Muirchertach Muimnech] with the new levies of Sil Murray plundered Mac Gosdelb [Philip Costello] and Tir Maine as far as Athlone.

And

Now Aed mac Ruaidri and Cormac mac Tomaltaig [Mac Diarmata] and Donn Oc [Mac Airechtaig] and the rest of the Sil Murray were in the wood, since their cattle and folk had gone with them to Slieve Anierin [Iron Mts., Leitrim] and into inaccessible fastnesses, they determined to take no heed of the Galls and make no plans concerning them.

And

But Donn Oc said he would not do so; and having determined to take up a position on the western flank of the Galls, he went to Fincharn, having with him his own kinsmen, the youth of Sil Murray, his own Galls, the son of Domnall Bregach [fostered Bregia] O'Mailsechlainn with his Galls, and Brian son of Toirrdelbach [ O Conchobair], and there they watched the Galls passing by. Donn Oc sent a party to harass them, which maintained a good fight against them while he kept to his position on the Cairn [Findcharn, presumably], eagerly watching the fight. Then the Galls sent a large party of soldiery and horsemen to pass round the Cairn, and they [Donn's party] noticed nothing until they had surrounded it on the western side and Donn was left alone with a few of his kinsmen and Brian mac Toirrdelbaig; and it was but a short time that they were left together in this wise. For Donn was proclaimed and recognised and set upon, single-handed as he was, by many of the soldiers, and he had five arrows in his body when a horseman attacked him, and he had nothing but an axe; yet he kept the horseman at a distance, parrying his spear with the axe. At last the soldiery all rushed at him and this brave warrior, surrounded on every side, fell before the overpowering number of champions who were smiting him.

Note Aed mac Ruaidri was watching the Galls from the east and knew nothing of Donn Oc until "the route came upon him from the west, but made his escape by the power of his hands, without dishonor or harm. He turned upon one that was pressing after him and cast a javelin at him so that the shaft passed right through his body, and [after this] he and his party were allowed to depart without being attacked." Hugh was banished and went to O Neill [King of Chonchobar's provence, died this year], the Galls went to Slieve Anierin where women and children were killed and the multitude was reduced to cold and hunger.

[1243.7] Finnachta O Lugada, coarb of Benen and archdeacon of Tuaim, died at Martinmas.

Note Finnachta must have been the comarb, or successor of Bennignus [a disciple of St. Patrick]. He is called the"Great Dean of Tuaim," near which the church of Kilbannon is seated, in Galway. The Annals of the Four Masters call him coarb of Finen.

[1289.5] Simon O Finnachta, Archdeacon of Elphin, [rested].

[1308.7] Simon Oc O Finnachta rested in Christ.

[1309.10] MacWilliam [Burke] crossed the Curlieus northwards and ejected the son of Cathal from his stronghold. The vanguard of Macwilliam's army killed Donnchad O Finnachta [ h. Findachta] and others not enumerated here.4

[1326.4/5] Luirint O Lachtnain, Bishop of Elphin, rested in Christ. Master Seoan O Finnachta [Metra Sion O Findachta?] was then elected to the same bishopric.

[1350.3] Brian Mac Diarmata, eligible for the kingship of Moylurg, was unhappily killed at Roscommon by the men of Bishop O Finnachta, by an arrow-shot; and the man who was blamed for the shot, Ruaidri of the Chamber O Donnchada, was killed and mutilated for the deed.

[1354.8] Seaan O Finnachta, bishop of Elphin, rested in Christ.

[1360.10] Tuathal O Finnachta died this year.

[1361.12] Nicol O Finnachta died.

[AD 1406.6] Toirrdelbach Oc son of Aed son of Toirrdelbach, king of Connacht for twenty-two years in joint sovranty with O Conchobair Ruad, was killed by Cathal Dub son of O Conchobair Ruad and by Seaan, the son of Edmond son of Hobert son of Sir David Burke and Ben Muman daughter of [Aed] mac Fedlimid [O Conchobair], and by Diarmait O Tanaiden, who was boldly repaid for this crime, in the house of Richard son of Seaan Buide son of Edmund son of Hobert, [this was done] at Crecan by Fidicen [Creggs, Kilbegnet, Galway] in Clan Conway. Now this is one of three kings of Connacht who were killed in Clan Conway Conchobar Maenmaige son of Ruaidri son of Toirrdelbach Mor, and Ruaidri son of Cathal Ruad son of Conchobar Ruad son of Muirchertach Muimnech son of Toirrdelbach Mor King of Ireland, and Toirrdelbach Oc son of Aed son of Toirrdelbach Oc, as we have already said.

Note the MacDavid Burkes were the latter possessors of Clan Conway after the murder of the old chieftain Finnerty.

[AD 1411] Ben Muman daughter of Aed son of Feidlimid O Conchobair, Lady of Clanconway during the reign of three lords, died. [wife of McDavid Burke]

[AD 1468.22] Clanconway was ravaged by Edmund son of William himself and his sons, in wantonness and pride.

Note The McDavys [Burke] were lords of Clanconway. Why would they plunder their own kin? I believe many of the Finnertys remained when Burke was given the chieftainship and married OFinaghty's daughter. Ricard-FinnBurke was in knight's service to King Roderick and there is no record that he came with an army or his own people, that is why it remained Clanconway.

Annals of Tigernach

 

 

 

 

Annals of Tigernach

Annals of Tigernach

[AM 1029] The laying waste of Meath by MaelSechlainn [King of Ire].

and

Hua MaelSechlainn routed by the Gott [Stammerer], where fell Hua Cernachain, king of the Luigne.

and

The kingdom of Meath was seized by MaelSechlainn, and the Stammerer was expelled upon Lough Ree.

[675.1] Battle of Cenn Faelad with Blaithmic the son of Aeda Slain, and the young Tigh of Hui Maine in Dail Cealtru, the cause was Findachta Fleadhach son of Dunchadha. Findachta Fledach was the victor.

[675. 2] Finachta Fledhach begins to reign.

[676. 2] Destruction of Ailigh Frigrend by Findachta Fledach.

[677. 3 ] Battle between Findachta & the Laighen in the approximate location of Locha Gabra, into by which Finnachta was victorious.

[680. 3 ] Killing of Fianamla the son of Mail Tuile the king of Laighen, by Foidseachan, of his own people at the instignation of Finachta.

Finnachta took up a clerical life.

Finnachta is returned to the royal power.

[ 695. 1] King of Erenn. Fínachta, son of Dunchada son of Aeda Slani, King of Erenn & Bresal the son have been killed by slitting their throats at the battle of Grellaigh Dollaith, by Aed son of Dluthaigh, king of Fear Cul, son of Ailella, the son of Aeda Slain & by Congal son of Conaing the son of Congail the son of Aedha Slaíne. [Saint] Mo Ling of Luachra dedicated a poem for Finachta on this occasion

Alas for Finechta,

Today he lies in a gory bed.

May he have among the men of heaven,

[reward for] remitting the Boruma [cattle-tribute].

[Saint] Adhomnan has sung

Finachta son of Dunchada

ro maith mor don naem,

tri cóecait cét bo-slabraidh,

is gach bó cona laegh.

[Saint] Moling has sung

The gap in which Finnechta was smitten,

Swift Kings were laying on another low.

When he has cast them down he does not

Ride over them.

Aed the swift, though he encounter [?] surliness.

[ 696. 8] Muiredhach Muillethan became King of Connacht.

Note a quo Siol Muidedhach; containing a tribe of the Hua Finnachtas of Clans Conway and Murchada of Connacht.

 

[ 702. 1] Muiredhach Muillethan, King of Connacht died.

[718. 8] Connri son of Congail Cennfhada & Ailill son of Finnachta [Fleadhach the Monarch] have been killed by slitting the throat.

[ 723. 3] Indrechtach M' Muireadhaigh, King of Connacht, dies in-ailithri a Cluain.

 

[ 735. 4 Airechtach of the clann Dunchadha king of Fiachrach Muaidh of Connacht, and Cathal son of Muiredhaigh, King of Connacht, die.

Note King Muiredhach was the father of Conbhach who was the ancestor of the Finnertys of Clan Conway of Connacht, and ancestor to the Finnertys of Clan Murrogh of Connacht. The two kings of Connacht, Indrechtacht and Cathal were brothers of Conbhach.

 

[AD 1037] Three of the Hui Fallomain [OFallon clann Uadach in Roscommon] and Finachta Hua hUrchada were treacherously killed by Conchobhar.

Note Conchobhar may have been Hugh (O'Conor) who later became king of Connaught. Finachta "hUrchada" was probably of Clan "Murchada" of the Champions.

Annals of Inisfallen

Age of Christ AI 485.1. . The battle of Granard (Mac Erce victor), in which Finnchad, king of the Laigin, fell; and Cairpre [was] victor, as others say. [AU 485, 486].

AI 493.1. The battle of Srath Echaill, in which Fraech son of Finnchad, king of Laigin, fell, and Eochu, son of Cairpre, was victor.

AI 676.1. Destruction of Ailech Frigrend by Finnechta. [AU 676].

AI 694.1. . Death of Finnechta son of Dúnchad, king of Laigin. [AU 695].

AI723.1

 

Kl. Death of Indrechtach son of Muiredach, king of Connachta.

AI728.1

 

Kl. Death of Domnall son of Cellach, king of Connachta.

AI736.1

 

Kl. Death of Cathal son of Muiredach, king of Connachta.  Fínnechta Fledach, son of Dúnchad it was he who remitted the Bóroma Laigen to Moling of Luachair for a poem which Moling had composed for him.  For during the reign of forty kings it was paid, viz. from Tuathal Techtmar to Fínnachta. For during the reign of forty kings it was paid, viz. from Tuathal Techtmar to Fínnachta. That was the recompense for the two daughters of Tuathal, whom Eochu son of Eochu, king of Laigin, wantonly killed. This, moreover, was the Bóroma thrice five thousand cows, and thrice five thousand boars, and thrice five thousand mantles. Each of these also [to be paid] yearly. It was thus the tribute used to be paid. This Fínnechta reigned ten years.

Note:  The story is that Eochu the King of Leinster was given  the MonarchTuthal Techtmar's daughter in marriage. She was not as pretty as Tuathal's other daughter so Eochu locked her up and starved her.  He told Tuathal the daughter died and was given the other daughter as a wife.  The new wife discovered her starving sister and died of grief.

..

 

title

Click to add text, images, and other content

title

Click to add text, images, and other content

title

Click to add text, images, and other content

Annals of Loch C'e

Annals of Loch C'e

[AD 1185] "Flann O'Finnechta, dux of Clann-Murchadha, mortuus est."

Note The index states the Clann Murchadha [were the tribe name of the O'Finnachtas seated on the east side of the river Suck in county Roscmmon]. Also the index of the Annals of Loch Ce state under the heading; "Baile-mic-Murchada [Ballymacmurragh, parish of Tibohine, barony of Frenchpark, county of Roscommon]." translation the town of the son of Murchad/Murragh.

 

[AD 1188] Flaithbhertach, son of Sitric O'Finnachta, occisi sunt."

[AD 1189] "Conchobhar Maenmhaighe, son of Ruaidhri, chief king of Connacht, and royal heir of all Erinn, was killed by his own favorites, viz --Muirchertach, son of Cathal, son of Diarmaid, and O'Finnachta, i.e. the Crosach Donn2 O'Finnachta, and the Mendtach O'Cimlidhcain, through the instigation of his own brother, viz. Conchobhar O'Diarmada. In the entrance of Tochar-Gibhsi he was slain.

and

Conchobhar O'Diarmada,4 son of Rhuaidhri O'Conchobhair, royal heir of Connacht, was killed by Cathal Carrach, son of Conchobhar Maenmhaighe, in revenge for his father."

Note 2 Tochar-Gibhsi is a roadway in Clan Conway, barony of Ballymoe. The word crosach means cross-streaked, or seamed, and was sometimes applied to persons having scars across the face. Note 4 O'Diarmada. In the Annals of Ulster [Dublin] the words "mac Cormac" are added over "O'Diarmada."

 

[AD 1225]

"The sons of Ruaidhri were at this time in front of Loch-mic-Oiredhaigh in Glenn-na-Mochart," [Mayo]

The son of Cathal Crobhderg, with the foreigners, decided to go after the cattle of the Tuatha, Sil Muiredhaigh, and Clann-Tomaltaigh, ........ .&etc.

and

"As regards the sons of Ruaidhri, moreover; the resolution they adopted at Loch-mic-Airedhaigh was, to disperse until his Foreigners should separate from the son of Cathal Crobhderg. viz-the two sons of Ruaidhri-Toirdhelbhach and Aedh-and the son of Maghnus, and Donn Og [note Mac Airechtaigh, or Mageraghty], were to go to meet O'Flaithbhertaigh, their mutual ally; and .....etc."

Note Donn Og was the son-in-law of O'Flaithbhertaigh.

and

"Tadgh O'Finnachta, a man of trust to Aedh, son of Ruaidhri, was killed by the people of Mac Aedhagain, while on a scouting party in the same war. ."

Note the MacEgans were brehons to several Kings/Princes. These Mac Egans were the branch located in Cruffon, barony of Killain, co. Galway and in barony Ballymoe, co. Roscommon.

 

And

Muiredhach O'Finnachta, chieftain of Clann-Finnachta [or Clann-Murchadha], died in a vessel on Loch-Oirbsen; and he was quite well going into it.

[AD 1289] Simon O'Finnachta, archdeacon of Elphin, in Christo quievit."

note The Four Masters say that Simon was Erenagh of Elphin. The Erenagh managed the lands of the church.

[AD 1308] "Simon O'Finnachta quievit on Christo."

Note The Annals of Connacht call him "Oc," or the younger.

[AD 1316]

[AD 1326] "Laurence O'Lachtnain, bishop of Oilfinn, in Christo quievit. Metra4 John O'Finnaghta was afterwards elected to the same bishopric."

Note 4Metra. Me'' [probably a mistake for Maigistir] In other records the spelling is "Seoan O Findachta." Note The name was spelled using the letter "d."

 

 

[AD 1350] "Brian Mac Diarmada, royal heir of Magh-Luirg, was unfortunately killed in Ros-Comain, by the Bishop O'Finachta's people, with one discharge of an arrow; and the man who was convicted of the shot, i.e. Ruaidhri-int-seomra [of the chambers], O'Donnchadha, was slain and mangled there."

and

"John O'Finnachta, bishop of Oilfinn, in Christo quievit."

and

The Annals of Connacht [Freeman]

 

 

 

 

 

The Book of Ballymote

Book of Ballymote

Sil Muiredhach

Finnachta, Finachta, and Fhinachta extracts

Genelach Clann Murchaidha mc. Innrachtaigh

 

Murchad m. Innrachtaigh tri mc. lais .i. Ferghus Cinaeth Braen.

Sil Ferghusa uero Mc. Gleidnechan & .H. Finachta Mc. Gleidnechan .H. Carmacan.

Note Murchad son of Innrachtaig had three sons Ferghus, Cinaeth and Braen.

 

Gleidnechan m. Fergusa m. Murcada m. Innrachtaigh.

Note Gleidnechan was the son of Fergus who was the son of King Innrachtach.

 

Ua Murchada m. Flainn m. Gletnechan m. Congalaigh m. Fergusa m. Murcada m.

Innrachtaigh.

Note Murchada was son of Flainn who was the son of Gletnachan who was son of Fergus. The next genealogy switches to Fhinachta brother of this Flainn, two sons of Gletnachan.

 

 

Muircertach m. Muiredaigh m. Gilli Granna m. Cinaeth m. Muiredaigh m.

Fhinachta m. Gleidnecan m. Fergusa m. Murcadha m. Innrachtaigh m. Muiredaigh . [muilethain].

NoteThis genalogy follows the previous for four generation from Muiredaigh son of Fhinachta son of Gleidnecan. The next genealogy switces from Cinaeth' son Gilli Granna a greatgrandson of Fhinachta's to Gilli Granna's brother Flaind [son of Cenaeth]

 

Finachta m. Guillbeithi m. Flaind m. Cinaith m. Muiredaigh m. Finachta m.

Gletnecan m. Fergusa m. Murcada m. Innrachtaigh m. Muiredaigh[muilethain] .

Note Finachta son of Guillbeithi son of Flaind. Two Finachtas in this genealogy.

Murgal mc. Indrachtaigh dona mc. airedha leis .i. Tomaltach. [note Tomaltach son of Murgal son of Indrachtaigh]

Tri mc. laisidhe .i. Murgeas, Finachta, Darmait Find. [note three sons of Tomaltach]

Note The above Finachta is the King of Connact and possibly St. Finnachta.

Taidhg righ Connacht isin chath cetna dano romarbhadh

Geibhennach mc. Aeda righ .H. Maine & Urchadh m. Flaind mc. Gleinnechan

taisech Claindi Murchadha.

 

Clann Concobair anno sa and so.

 

Fland & Breasal da mc. Conchobuir m. Muiredaig M.

Note Conchobuir was the son of King Muiredaig along with brothers Conmach, Cathal and Indreachtaig. He had two sons, Fland and Breasal. The following genealogy is for Flaind.

 

Do Clainn Flaind arda andso sis.

Maelmithig m. Murchada m. Draighnen m. Murcada m. Draignen m. Finnachta m.

Muirghiusa m. Duibindracht m. Flaind {103ab} m. Conchobhuir m. Muiredaig [muilethain].

Note The following genalogy switches from Flaind to his brother Breasal

 

 

Genelach Sil mBresail.

Siblechan m. Finnachta m. Flannabrat m. Irghalaigh m. Bresail m. Conchobair m. Muiredaig [muilethain]..

Note It is interesting that both branches of Clan Conchobhar have a Finnachta.

 

 

Clann Connmaigh mc. Muiredhaigh annosa.

 

Tri mc. la Connmhach mc. Muiredaigh & robe Connmhach, mc. ro sine ig

Muiredaigh & dleghait gidh a cland sairsi mhor & o noir o claind na mc. aile

Muiredhaigh ar a sinnsirecht .i. Cet cornasgach ol & copan gacha hathoil &

cuib rind gacha righ & gacha taisigh.

 

Atiat so tra anmand mc. Connmaigh mc. Muiredhaigh .i. Fichellach, Donn garadh,

Ceithearnach. [note 3 sons of Connmaigh son of Muiredhaidg]

Tri mc. la Ceithernach .i. Flaithemain, Cosgrach, Flaithruire.

Aen mc. dano la Donngharadh .i. Finnachta. [note the son of Donngharadh a quo Dungar is Finnachta]

Da mc. la Finnachta .i. Bengene, Cathal.

Note the two sons of Finnachta are Bengene, and Cathal and, as follows Conighe is the son of Bengena.

 

Mc. Concighe mc. Beingeine mc. Finnachta mc. Duind garadh [Dungar] mc. Connmaigh.

{103ba}

 

 

Annals of Leinster

Fínsnechta Cethardec

Finsnechta Cethardec mac Cellaig (died 808) was a King of Leinster of the Uí Dúnchada sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Cellach mac Dúnchada (died 776), a previous king.[1] He ruled from 795 to 808. His byname Cethardec meant "four-eyes".

On May 6, 795 the previous king Bran Ardchenn Ardchenn mac Muiredaig of the Uí Muiredaig sept and his queen Eithne were assassinated (by burning) in a church at Cell Cúile Duma (near Stradbally, Co.Leix) by Finsnechta Cethardec mac Cellaig (died 808) of the Uí Dúnchada sept.[2] This was a ruthless political gesture directed at the high king Donnchad Midi (died 797) (Eithne was his sister).[3] By this act Finsnechta acquired the throne of Leinster.

In 804 the high king Áed Oirdnide led a hosting into Leinster and got the submission of Finsnechta.[4] Aed assembled the forces of Leth Conn at Dún Cuair on the Leinster border and attacked Leinster twice in one month.[5] The Annals of the Four Masters say of this event[6]

Afterwards he returns to Leinster, Aedh, a soldier who shunned not battles; The robber king did not cease till he left them in dearth.

The high king did not appear satisfied with this submission and returned in 805 and deposed Finsnechta. He installed Muiredach mac Ruadrach (died 829) of the Uí Fáeláin and Muiredach mac Brain of the Uí Muiredaig as joint kings.[7] Finsnechta took refuge with Muirgius mac Tommaltaig (died 815), the King of Connacht who then aided him in recovering his throne in 806.[8] Finsnechta recovered the throne by defeating the sons of Ruaidrí mac Fáeláin (died 785), Muiredach and Diarmait.

Finsnechta set about ensuring his control of the church of Kildare. This led to hostility with the Uí Failgi of Offaly. In 803 Óengus mac Mugróin, king of Uí Fhailgi, was treacherously killed by Finsnechta's followers and in 806 when he recovered the Leinster throne, the Uí Failgi king, Flaithnia mac Cináeda, was killed in his fort at Rathangan.[9] Two of his brothers, Fáelán (died 804) and Áed (died 829), a nephew and a grandnephew all enjoyed the abbacy of Kildare in the 9th century and Finsnechta's sister Muirenn (died 831) was abbess of Kildare.[8] Finsnechta, himself, died at Kildare from hemorrhoids[10]

Notes

^ T.M. Charles-Edwards, Early Christian Ireland, Appendix XVII

^ Annals of Ulster, AU 795.1

^ Charles-Edwards, pg.578

^ Annals of Ulster AU 804.10

^ Francis J.Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings, pg.160

^ Annals of the Four Masters, M799.9

^ Annals of Ulster, AU 805.7

^ a b Byrne, pg.160

^ Annals of Ulster AU 803.6, AU 806.10

^ Annals of Ulster, AU 808.6

References

· Annals of Ulster at CELT Corpus of Electronic Texts <http//celt.ucc.ie/index.html> at University College Cork <http//www.ucc.ie/>

· Charles-Edwards, T. M. (2000), Early Christian Ireland, Cambridge Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-36395-0 </wiki/SpecialBookSources/0521363950>

· Byrne, Francis John (2001), Irish Kings and High-Kings, Dublin Four Courts Press, ISBN 978-1-85182-196-9 </wiki/SpecialBookSources/9781851821969>

· Book of Leinster,Rig Laigin at CELT Corpus of Electronic Texts <http//celt.ucc.ie/index.html> at University College Cork <http//www.ucc.ie/>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Annals of Ulster

The Annals of Ulster

432 A.D. Patrick arrived in Ireland ……….. In the 15th or 14th year of Laegaire son of Niall [King of Ireland].

467 A.D. Death of Uter Pendragon, king of England, to whom succeeded his son, King Arthur, who instituted the Round Table.

485 A.D. Kalends of January. The first battle of Granairet. Coirpre [Cairbre], son of Niall Naigiallach, was victor, and Finnchad [Finnacta] fell; or Mac Erca was victor, as others state.

[Note] says, F. son of Daig, king of Ui Cheinnselaigh. May not be correct as Daig or

Deagh was a brother of Eanna Cinnsalla, and would be too old. See 494 entry below,

 492 A.D. Patrick the Archbishop died.495.1. The second battle of Granairet, in which fell Fraech son of Finnchad son of

Gairchú son of Fothad son of Eochu Lámhdóid son of Mess Corb, king of Laigin.

Eochu, son of Coirpre-i.e. Eochu son of Coirpre son of Ailill son of Dúnlang son

of Énna Niad-was victor.

497 A.D. [again] Or here, the second battle of Granairet, in which Fraech son of Finnchad [Finnachta] , king of Laigin Desgabhair, fell. Eochu, son of Coirpre, was victor.

Note Laigin Desgabhair is south Leinster or Ui-Ceinnsealaigh [Hy Kinsley].

 

558 or 564 A.D. Brenainn [Saint] founded the church at Cluain Ferta.

617 A.D. The fifth year of the reign of the emperor Heraclius.

649 A.D. The slaying of Ragallach son of Uatu, king of Connacht. By Mael Brigte son of Mothlachan and the Corcu Cullu.

Note Ragallach is the ancestor of the O'Finnertys of the Sil Murry.

 849 A.D. Finnechta son of Diarmait, abbot of Dam Liac, Mael Fuataig, abbot of Ard Brecain, Onchu, bishop and anchorite of Slaine, died.

Note From the Onomasticon Goedelicum; dam-liac; Duleek townland., parish and town in Meath, F. 170; al. Doimliacc, F. 165, F. 170; al. Doimhliag, Fg. 224; Damliag, Au. i. 176; al. Damliac Ciánáin, Cg. 6, 18, Fia. 196; Dom-liacc Chianán, Tl. 104; i mBregaibh etir Áth Cliath acus Droichet Atha, Md. 314; in Bregia, C. 443, Fep., Ct. 217; Domhnach Sairighi cCiannachta ag D. Cianain, Md. 170, Fir. 163; Cianán of Damliacc Cianáin, Bco. 24 a, Z. 351, K. 165 a; Daim-liacc, al. Doim-liag .i. tegdais cloch, H. 2, 16, p. 101, H. 3, 18, p. 69, .i. domus lapidum, A. 12 b.damliacc arda brecan; i Feraib Breg, Au. ii. 92.damliacc beannchair; belonged to St. Comgall of Bangor in Ulst., Fir. 510, Fm. ii. 886; Donnchadh Ua Mathghamhna, K. of Ulst., slain there, Fir. 597.

 

AndIndrechtach, abbot of I, came to Ireland with the halicoms of Colum Cille.

Note This may be St. Indrechtach hua Finnachta of Iona; see Saints in this book.

 

855 A.D. Finnechta i.e. son of Mael Brigte, was treacherously killed.

Note Maelbrighde Abbot of Clonmacnoise died 888; M'Bishop of Slaine died 874;

M' King of Conaille died 829; M'Archbishop of Munster died 895; M' Lord of Conaille died 867.

 

879 A.D. Finnechta son of Mael Corca, king of the Luigni of Connacht, dies.

Note Of the O'Haras and O'Garas of Sligo; a Munster tribe descending from Heber, who settled in what is today counties Sligo and Mayo.

1184.10. Flann Ua Finnachta, chief of Clann-Murchadha, dies.

1188.9. Domnall, son of Lochlann Ua Maeilruanaidh and Fearghal Ua Taidhg 'of the [hospitable] household' and Flaithbertach, Ua Finnachta, son of Riucc, were

slain.Age of Christ 1285.4. Simon Ua Finachta, erenagh of Oil-finn [Elphin], rested in Christ.1305.8.William de Burgh [then] went to the Monastery of the Buill and the

Clann-Muircertaigh came into Tir-Oilella. Much corn was burned and [much]

destroyed by them. Mac William came down past Corr-sliabh. The son of Cathal was

put out of his stronghold by him and Domnall O'Finachta and other persons were

killed by the van of the host of Mac William.1323.3. Lawrence O'Lachtna[i]n, bishop of Oil-finn, rested in Christ. Master John

O'Finachta was chosen to the same bishopric.1351.7. The bishop of Sil-Muiredhaigh [Elphin], namely, Master John Ua Finachta, died.1358.5. Nicholas O'Finachta [died].

 

 

 

 

 

title

Click to add text, images, and other content

Annals of Ireland part I

From the Annals of Ireland,

also known as

the Annals of the Four Masters

The reigns of the posterity of Ollamh Fodhla, i.e., his sons and grandsons are all shown of this page in order to better represent the conflict of the period.

 Age of the World, 3942. This was the first year of the reign of Finnachta (28th Monarch), son of Ollamh Fodhla, over Ireland.

Note the year is about 1258 B.C. Finnachta is from the line of Ir, son of Milesius.

Age of the World, 3942. This was the twentieth year of the reign of Finnachta over Ireland. He afterwards died of the plague in Magh-inis, in Uladh (now the barony of Lecale, in county Down). It was in the reign of Finnachta that snow fell with the taste of wine, which blackened the grass. From this the cognomen, Finnachta, adhered to him. Elim was his name at first.

Age of the World, 3943. The first year of the reign of Slanoll (29th Monarch), son of Ollamh Fodhla (brother of Finnachta), over Ireland.

Note 1257 B.C.

Age of the World, 3959. The seventeenth year of Slanoll in the sovereignty; and he died, at the end of that time, at Teamhair (Tara), and it is not known what disease carried him off; he was found dead, but his colour did not change. He was afterwards buried; and after his body had been forty years in the grave, it was taken up by his son, i.e. Oilioll mac Slanuill; and the body had remained without rotting or decomposing during this period. This thing was a great wonder and surprise to the men of Ireland.

Age of the World, 3960. The first year of the reign of Gedhe Ollghothach (30th Monarch) over Ireland.

Note 1240 B.C. Gedhe was a brother of Finnachtach. From the Annals of Clonmacnoise "Observers of antiquity affirm of him that the conversation of his subjects in general in his time, was as sweet a harmony to one another as any musick, because they lived together in such concord, amity, and attonement among themselves that there was no discord or strife heard to grow between them for any cause whatsoever."

Age of the World, 3971. The twelfth year of Gedhe Ollghothach in the sovereignty of Ireland; and he fell at the end of that time by Fiacha, son of Finnachta.

Note Fiacha was the nephew of Gedhe Ollgothach.

Age of the World, 3972. The first year of Fiacha Finnailches (31st Monarch), son of Finnachta, in the sovereignty of Ireland. Every calf that was brought forth in his reign was white-headed.

Note 1228 B.C.

Age of the World, 3991. After Fiacha Finnailches (son of Finnachta) had been twenty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he fell in the battle of Breagh, by Bearnghal (his cousin), son of Gedhe Ollghothach. It was by Fiacha Finnailches that Dun-chuile-Sibrinne, i.e. Ceanannus (now Kells, a town in east Meath), was erected . Wherever his habitation was (placed), Ceanannus was its name. It was by this king that the earth was first dug in Ireland, that water might be in wells. It was difficult for the stalk to sustain its corn in his reign.

Age of the World, 3992. The first year (of the reign) of Bearnghall (32nd Monarch), the son of Gedhe Ollghothach, over Ireland.

Note 1208 B.C. Bearnghall was the nephew of Finachta.

Age of the World, 4003. Bearnghal, the son of Gedhe Ollghothach, after having been twelve years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Oilioll (his cousin), son of Slanoll, and Sirna, son of Dian (Heremonians).

Age of the World, 4004. This was the first year of the reign of Oiliol (33rd Monarch), son of Slanoll, over Ireland.

Note 1196 B.C. Oiliol was the nephew of Finachta.

Age of the World, 4019. Oilioll, son of Slanoll, after having been sixteen years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Sirna, son of Dian.

Note 1180 B.C. This Sirna was of the Line of Heremon, son of Milesius; and he had helped Oilioll gain the throne from his cousin; both of them being of the Line of Ir, son of Milesius.

Age of the World, 4020. This was the first year of the reign of Sirna (34th Monarch), son of Dian, son of Deman ( Rotheacta), in the sovereignty of Ireland. It was this Sirna, son of Dian that wrested the government of Teamhair (Tara) from the Ulta, i.e. the race of Ir. It was he, too, that revenged upon them (the death of) Roitheachtaigh mac Main, whom they had slain at Cruachain; &etc.

Note Sedna, who was of the race of Ir, slew Rotheacta micMaoin of the race of Heremon who was the 22nd Monarch and mounted the throne, in 1357 B.C. ThisSirna or Siorna, the 34th Monarch, was a grandson of Rotheacta, and Ollam Fodhla was a grandson of Sedna.

Age of the World, 4176. After Roitheachtaigh (35th Monarch) had been seven years in the sovereignty of Ireland, lightning burned him at Dun-Sobhairce (Dunseverick). It was by this Roitheachtaigh that chariots of four horses were first used in Ireland.

Note He began his reign in 1030 B.C.

Age of the World, 4177. Elim Oillfinshneachta (36th Monarch), son of Roitheachtaigh, after having been one year in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell, at the end of that year, by Giallchaidh, son of Oilioll Ollchain. Snow, with the taste of wine, fell in this year, whence he was called Oillfinshneachtta.

Note Giallchaidh was of the race of Heremon. Elim was of the race of Heber, son of Milesius of Spain, whose descendants for the most part, became the Kings, Princes, and nobility of Munster. His grandfather Siorghnath Saoghalach (Sirna or Siorna) wrested the monarchy from the race of Ir where it had been for the reign of seven monarchs; and returned the monarchy to the descendants of Heber, son of Milesius of Spain.

Age of the World, 4178. The first year of Giallchaidh (37th), son of Olioll Olchain, son of Sirna, in the sovereignty of Ireland.

Note 1022 B.C. Giallchaidh was the grandson of Sirna, who wrested the monarchy from the Line of Ir, and returned it to the Line of Heremon.

Age of the World, 4186. Giallchaidh, after having been nine years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Art Imleach, in Magh Muaidhe.

Note 1013 B.C. Magh-Muaidhe.-This was either the plain of the River Moy, in North Connaught, or a plain situated at the foot of Cnoc-Muaidhe, or Knockmoy, in the county of Galway.

Age of the World, 4187. This was the first year of Art Imleach (38th), son of Elim Oillfinshneachta, in the sovereignty of Ireland.

Age of the World, 4198. Art Imleach, after having been twelve years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Nuadhat Finnfail (the son of Giallchaidh of the Line of Heremon).

Age of the World, 4199. This was the first year of the reign of Nuadhat Finnfail (39th) over Ireland. (1001 B.C.)

Age of the World, 4238. Nuadhat Finnfail, after having been forty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Breas (grandson of Elim Oillfinshneachta), son of Art Imleach.

Age of the World, 4239. This was the first year of the reign of Breas (40th), son of Art Imleach, over Ireland. (961 B.C.)

Note Annals of Clonmacnoise; "Breasry", " In whose time Fomorie came again into Ireland; but he overthrew them in many battles, and did quite expel them out of the kingdom." A.K.A. Breas Rioghachta.

Age of the World, 4247. Breas, after having been nine years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Eochaidh Apthach (41st), at Carn-Conluain.

Note (B.C. 952) Eochaidh Apthach is of the Line of Ithe, the brother of Milesius of Spain. Eochaid's slayer and the next monarch was Fionn of the Line of Ir, which returned the monarchy to the Kings of Ulster.

 

Age of the World, 4546. Macha Mongruadh, daughter of Aedh Ruadh, son of Badharn, after she had been seven years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Reachtaidh Righdhearg, son of Lughaidh. It was Macha that commanded the sons of Dithorba (after bringing them into servitude) to erect the fort of Eamhain, that it might be the chief city of Ulster for ever, as we have said before; and it was Cimbaeth and Macha that fostered Ugaine Mor.

Age of the World, 4566. Reachtaidh Righdhearg, son of Lughaidh, after having been twenty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Ugaine Mor, in revenge of his foster-mother, i.e. Macha Mongruadh.

Age of the World, 4606. At the end of this year Ugaine Mor, after he had been full forty years king of Ireland, and of the whole of the west of Europe, as far as Muir-Toirrian (Mediterranean Sea), was slain by Badhbhchadh (of the Line of Heremon), at Tealach-an-Chosgair (Kill-Droicheat on the Boyne River), in Magh-Muireadha, in Bregia. This Ugaine was he who exacted oaths, by all the elements visible and invisible, from the men of Ireland in general, that they would never contend for the sovereignty of Ireland with his children or his race.

Badhbhchadh, son of Eochaidh Buadhach, was for a day and a half after Ugaine in the sovereignty of Ireland, when Laeghaire Lorc, son of Ugaine, slew him, in revenge of his father.

Age of the World, 4608. Laeghaire Lorc (68th Monarch), son of Ugaine, after having been two years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was killed by Cobhthach Cael Breagh (his brother), at Carman (Wexford). Note this happened in 591 B.C.

Age of the World, 4658. Cobhthach Cael Breagh (69th Monarch), son of Ugaine, after having been fifty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Labhraidh Loingseach, (i.e.) Maen, son of Oilioll Aine, with thirty kings about him, at Dinn-righ, on the brink of the Bearbha (Barrow).

Note Labhraidh Loingseach or Maen was the grandson of Laeghaire Loc. Dinn-righ in Magh-Ailbhe, and the house or palace Bruidhin Tuana-Teanbath.

 

From the Annals of Clonmacnoise, as translated by Mageoghegan, as follows "Also the said Covhagh slew Oilill Ayne (his nephew),son of the said King Logery (his brother), after which foul fact done, Lawry Longseach, (great) grandchild of king Owgany, and (grand) son of Logery Lork, was banished by him, who remained many years beyond seas, seeking to bring into this land foreigners to invade it; and, in the end, after long banishment, his great uncle, the king of Ireland, made friendship with him, and bestowed upon him and his heirs, for ever, the province of Lynster, since which time there hath been mortal hatred, strife, and debate, between those of the province of Connaught, Ulster, and Lynster, the one descending of King Covhagh, and the other of his brother, King Logery Lork. King Covhagh was invited to a feast by his said nephew, Lawrey, and there was treacherously burnt, together with thirty Irish princes, in his own house, after he had reigned 17 years. King Covhagh had little care of the Irish proverb, which is, that 'one should never trust a reconciled adversary.' this murther was committed on the Barrowe side, at a place called dinrye or deannrye, and divers of the nobility were there murthered as aforesaid. &etc. Lawry Loyngseagh, after thus murthering his uncle, succeeded as king of the kingdom. The province of Lynster took the name of him (recte, in his time), for in the time of his banishment he brought divers foreigners into this land that were armed with a kind of weapons which they brought with them, like pykes or spears, which, in Irish, were called Layny.

Age of Christ 499 (recte 504). The Battle of Seaghais (was fought) by the Monarch Muircheartach macEarca (131st Mon) against Duach Teangumha, King of Connaught; (and where Duach was slain); The reason for the battle was that the Monarch had guaranteed the protection of Duach's brother Eochaidh Tirmcharna, and King Duach took him prisoner in violation of the guarantee. Duach's daughter Duiseach was the wife of the Monarch Muircheartach, but was the foster-child of her uncle Eochaidh, and she persuaded her husband to fight this battle against her father. From the Book of Lecan, fol. 195 b.

Note Battle of Seaghais This was the ancient name of the Curlieu Hills, near Boyle, on the confines of counties Roscommon and Sligo. The battle is entered in the Annals of Ulster at the year 501.

The Age of Christ, 554. The sixteenth year of Diarmaid (133rd Mon) The last feast of Teamhair was made by Diarmaid, King of Ireland. Curnan, son of Aedh, son of Eochaidh Tirmcharna, i.e. the son of the King of Connaught, was put to death by Diarmaid, son of Cearbhall, in violation of the guarantee and protection of Colum Cille (saint), having been forcibly torn from his hands, which was the cause of the battle of Cul-Dreimhne.

Note Cul Dreimhne is in the barony of Carbury to the north of the town of Sligo, in county Sligo.

Age of Christ, 555. The seventeenth year of Diarmaid. The battle of Cul-Dreimhne was gained against Diarmaid, son of Cearbhall, by Fearghus and Domhnall, the two sons of Muircheartach, (the) son of Earca; (and) by Ainmire, son of Sedna; and by Ainnidh, son of Duach; and by Aedh, son of Eochaidh Tirmcharna, King of Connaught. .

Note; It is interesting that the mother of Feargus and Domhnall, sons of Muircheartach mac Earca, was the daughter of Eochaidh Tirmcharna; Eochaidh Tirmcharna being the grandfather of Curnan who had been executed by the Monarch. Ainmire, son of Sedna, was also a northern Hy-Niall, and became the 138th Monarch. Duach and Eochaid Tirmcharna were brothers (It was) in revenge of the killing of Curnan, son of Aedh, son of Eochaidh Tirmcharna, (while) under the protection of Colum Cille, the Clanna-Neill of the North and the Connaughtmen gave this battle of Cul-Dreimhne to King Diarmaid; and also on account of the false sentence which Diarmaid passed against Colum Cille about a book of Finnen (saint), which Colum had transcribed without the knowledge of Finnen, when they left it to award of Diarmaid, who pronounced the celebrated decision, "To every cow belongs its calf," and etc.

Colum Cille said

O God, wilt thou not drive off the fog, which envelopes our number,

The Host which has deprived us of our livelihood,

The host which proceeds around the carns!

He is a son of storm who betrays us.

My Druid, -- he will not refuse me, -- is the Son of God, and may he side with me;

How grandly he bears his course, the steed of Baedan before the host;

Power by Baedan of the yellow hair will be borne from Ireland on him (the steed).

Note Baedan was the 3rd son of Muircheartach Mor Mac Earca, and

became Monarch, jointly with his nephew Eochaidh in the year 566.

Fraechan, son of Teniusan (Druid of King Diarmaid), was he who made the Erbhe-Druadh for Diarmaid. Saran, son of Cormac, son of Eoghan, was he who placed the Erbhe-Druadh over his head. Three thousand was the number that fell of Diarmaid's people. One man only fell on the other side (Colum Cille's), Mag Laim was his name, for it was he that passed beyond the Erbhe Druadh.

Note Though Columbkille's prayers were able to protect his forces while they remained within his consecrated limits, the individual who passed into the vortex of the magical vortex or circle of the Druids, immediately lost his life. Saint Columbia was born in Tyconnell and was a Hy-Niall.

In his time the Royal Palace of Tara was deserted.

The Age of Christ, 574. The ninth year of Aed (Aed(2) 140th Monarch). The killing of Aedh, a son of Eochaidh Tirmcharna, by the Ui Briunn.

Note He was killed by his own tribe, the Ui Bruinn who were descendants of King Brian son of the Monarch, Eochaidh Moyvane.

The Age of Christ, 597. The third year of Aedh( Slaine) and Colman (Rimidh). The battle of Sleamhain, in Meath, (was fought) by Colman Rimidh against Conall Cu, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire; and Conall was defeated. Uata, son of Aedh, son of Eochaidh Tirmcharna, King of Connaught, died.

Note This must be a joint reign in the monarchy. The Roll of Monarchs give Aed(2) of the race of Heremon as #140, beginning in 567; and Aodh Slaine of the race of Heremon as #140, beginning in 594. Uata a.k.a. Uadach.

The Age of Christ, 645. The sixth year of Conall and Ceallach. Raghallach, son of Uatach, King of Connaught, was killed by Maelbrighde, son of Mothlachan, on Sunday precisely, of which was said

Raghallach, son of Uatach, was pierced on the back of a white steed;

Muireann (his wife) hath well lamented him, Cathal [his son] hath well avenged him.

Cathal is this day in battle, though he is bound (to peace) in the presence of kings;

Though Cathal is without a father, his father is not without being revenged.

Estimate his terrible revenge from the account of it related;

He slew six men and fifty, he committed sixteen devastations.

I had my share like another, in the revenge of Raghallach,

I have the grey beard in my hand of Maelbrighde, son of Mothlachan.

Note This must have been a joint reign in the Monarchy. The Roll of the Monarchs shows Ceallach (Heremon) as #147, beginning in 639; and Congall (Heremon) as 148, beginning in 652.

Age of Christ, 649. Fearghus, son of Domhnall, and Fearghus, son of Raghallach, and Aedh Beathra, son of Cuimin, were killed by the Ui-Fiachrach-Aidhne.

Age of Christ 673. After Ceannfaeladh (152nd Mon), son of Blathmac (15oth Mon), son of Diarmaid, had been four years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Finnachta Fleadhach, in the battle of Aircealtair, at Tigh-Ua-Maine.

Note There is a place in the country of the Ui-Maine in Connaught called Ait-tighe Ua Maine, now called Attymany, situated in the parish of Cloonkeen-Kerill, barony of Tiaquin, in county Galway. Ceannfaeladh was a Northern Hy-Niall, and Finachtach was a Southern Hy-Niall; bothe of the Race of Niall & Heremon.

Age of Christ 674. The first year of Finnachta Fleadhach, son of Dunchadh, in the sovereignty over Ireland. The destruction of Aileach Frigreinn, by Finnshneachta, son of Dunchadh.

Note The royal fort of Aileach was sometimes called Aileach Frigreinn, from Frigreann, the architect who built it. This would be in north Ulster, east of Londonderry.

Age of Christ 675. The second year of Finnachta. A battle (was fought) between Finnsneachta and the Leinstermen, by the side of Loch-Gabhair; and the battle was gained over the Leinstermen.

Note Loch-Gabhair. -- Now Loughgower, or Logore, near Sunhshaughlin, in the country of Meath. Date given as 676 in Annals of Ulster.

Age of Christ 677. The fourth year of Finachta. the battle of Tailltin (was gained) by Finshneachta Fleadhach over Becc Boirche.

Age of Christ 678. The fifth year of Finachta. Fianamhail, son of Maeltuile, King of Leinster, was mortally wounded by Foicseachan, (one) of his own people, at the instigation of Finshneachta Fleadhach. Cathal the son of Raghallach (King of Conacht) died.

The Age of Christ, 678 . The sixth year of Finshneachta. St. Ciar, virgin, daughter of Duibrea, died on the 5th of January.

The Age of Christ, 680 . The seventh year of Finachta. The battle of Rath-mor-Maighe-Line (was gained) over the Britons, wherein were slain Cathasach, son of Maelduin, chief of the Cruithni (Dal-Araidhe), and Ultan, son of Dicolla.

The Age of Christ, 681. The eighth year of Finachta. Duncadh Muirisce, son of Maeldubh, King of Connaught, was slain.

Note Duncadh was Prince of Hy-Fiachrach-Muade; had been fostered in the territory of Muirisc, barony of Tireragh, Sligo.

The Age of Christ, 682. The ninth year of Finachta. Loch nEathach was turned into blood.

The Age of Christ, 683. The tenth year of Finachta. the devastation of Magh-Breagh, both churches and territories, by the Saxons, in the month of June precisely; and they carried off with them many hostages from every place which they left, throughout Magh-Breagh, together with many other spoils, and afterwards went to their ships. Congal, son of Guaire, died.

Note Egfrid, King of the Northumbrians sent Berctus, his general, with an army to Ireland. Magh Breagh is in East Meath; between Dublin and Drogheada, and between the Rivers Boyne and Liffey.

The Age of Christ, 684. The eleventh year of Finachta. A mortality upon all animals in general, throughout the whole world, for the space of three years, so that there escaped not one out of the thousand of any kind of animals. There was great frost in this year, so that the lakes and rivers of Ireland were frozen; and the sea between Ireland and Scotland was frozen, so that there was a communication between them on the ice. Adamnan (Saint) went to Saxon-land, to request (a restoration) of the prisoners which the North Saxons had carried off from Magh-Breagh the year before mentioned. He obtained restoration of them, after having performed wonders and miracles before the hosts; and they afterwards gave him great honour and respect, together with a full restoration of everything he asked of them.

The Age of Christ, 685. The twelfth year of Finachta. Finshneachta, the king, went on his pilgrimage.

The Age of Christ, 686. The thirteenth year of Finachta. St. Seghene, Bishop of Ard-Macha, died. St. Cuthbert, Bishop of Fearna, in England, died.

The Age of Christ, 687. The fourteenth year of Finachta. Congal, son of Maelduin, son of Aedh Beannan, King of West Munster, was slain. Bran, son of Conall, King of Leinster, died.

The Age of Christ, 688. The fifteenth year of Finachta. Fidhcellach, son of Flann, chief of Ui-Maine, (died).

The Age of Christ, 689. The sixteenth year of Finachta. Fearghus, son of Lodan (Aedain), King of Ulidia, was slain by the Ui-Eachdhach (people of Iveagh).

The Age of Christ, 690. The seventeenth year of Finachta. Bran Ua Faelain, King of Leinster, died. A battle between the Osraighi and the Leinstermen, wherein Faelchar Ua Maelodhra was slain. It rained a shower of blood in Leinster this year. Butter was there also turned into lumps of gore and blood, so that it was manifest to all in general. The wolf was heard speaking with human voice, which was horrific to all.

Note Bran Muit Ua Faelan was the19 King of Munster and his grandfather Faolan was the 18th King. He was also known as Bran Beag (#101 O'Toole pedigree). Annals of Clonmacnoise

 

Annals of Inishfallen

 

Age of Christ AI 485.1.  . The battle of Granard (Mac Erce victor), in which Finnchad, king of the Laigin, fell; and Cairpre [was] victor, as others say. [AU 485, 486].

 AI 493.1.  The battle of Srath Echaill, in which Fraech son of Finnchad, king of Laigin, fell, and Eochu, son of Cairpre, was victor.

 AI 676.1.  Destruction of Ailech Frigrend by Finnechta. [AU 676].

 AI 694.1. . Death of Finnechta son of Dúnchad, king of Laigin. [AU 695].

 AI723.1

Kl. Death of Indrechtach son of Muiredach, king of Connachta.

 AI728.1

Kl. Death of Domnall son of Cellach, king of Connachta.

 AI736.1

Kl. Death of Cathal son of Muiredach, king of Connachta.

 Fínnechta Fledach, son of Dúnchad: it was he who remitted the Bóroma Laigen to Moling of Luachair for a poem which Moling had composed for him. For during the reign of forty kings it was paid, viz. from Tuathal Techtmar to Fínnachta. That was the recompense for the two daughters of Tuathal, whom Eochu son of Eochu, king of Laigin, wantonly killed. This, moreover, was the Bóroma: thrice five thousand cows, and thrice five thousand boars, and thrice five thousand mantles. Each of these also [to be paid] yearly. It was thus the tribute used to be paid. This Fínnechta reigned ten years.

 

Onomasticon Goedelicum

 áit tíghe floinn; A. t. Flainn; the Leithseisreach Áite Tighe Foinn in Pobal Bhriain,

Ai. 108 a, Hb. 8 a; Attyflin, nr. Patrick's Well, c. Limerick. ait tige guairim in Inibofinne, Wc. 116, Fy. 477.

 achadh abla; Tipra Fhinnein 7 Leac in Pupail ic a. Abla, Lis. 25 a; is in Corunn i crích Luighne, in barony Corann, county Sligo; Luighni, slaughtered by Ui Ailella in Achadh Ablae, Au. i. 268; Diancecht's Tipra Slainge, in Achad Abla, N.W. of Mag Tuiredh, I. 166 b 1; Bb. 226 b; and Rd. Rc. xv. 59.

 achad conaire; al. Ached cáin, a. cáin Conaire, Fel. 130, O'Dav. 66; in Mi. it is put in Sligo, in Ac. 286 "Aghaconary in Mayo;" it is a village and p. in b. Leiny, Sligo, Fy. 477; in terra Lugniensium, Cs. 206, K. 181 b; its posttown is Ballymote; as a diocese it contains parts of Sligo, Mayo and a small part of Roscommon; i Luighnib Connacht, F. 130, Md. 214, Fg. 152, Mt. 31, Lct. 103 Fm. 1328, 1398, 1409, 1434; Lc. i. 239, 253, 261, &c.; a. Coinire, Con. 15 a, 32 b; S. Nathi of A., C. 134, Cs. 206; Nathi Presbyter in Achud Chonairi, feast on v. Id. Aug. Ll. 361, Lc. i. 409; the Coarb of Nathi of a. Connaire, al. the Bp. of Luighne, Ai. 61 b; Bps. of a. Conaire, Lc. [i] 253, 269, 305, 345, 419, 447, 451, 561, 647, ii 79, 209; village near Ballaghadereen; in the East of barony of Leiney there is Achonry House, and village; Cruimther Riagán ó a. Chonaire, Md. 214.

Note: a Finnachta [Heber] was of the Leyney Connacht.

 Aircheltra; Cend Faelad mac Cruannmaeil reigned 4 years, until he was slain by Fiannachta in Aircheltra (dative singular; Aircheltra, Sil. 402), Ll. 25 a; Sil. 402; Ceann Faoladh, slain in the battle of Airchealtra at Teach Ua Maine, Lg. 192; hi cath Airceltra oc Tigh Ua Maine, Fm. i. 282, Lec. 616; Sirna mac Dein defeated the Ultonians i cath Aircheltra, Ll. 19; Z. 470, col. 2; Lec. 64, 581; Lg. 107, Fm. i. 58; a hAgur, a hEactge, ... a Slemiun, a hAirceltraibh; Book of Lismore, folio 92 b.

 Ailcheltra; drochair Cendfaelaid i cath Ailcheltra la Finachta Fledach, I. 25 b, Bb. 49 a 33 a; cf. inis celtra.

 anghailech; .i. inhabitant of Anghaile, dp. hAnghailechaibh, Au. iii. 114. angebthi hui gabla fhini; in the Dál Chormaic, in Leinster, Ll. 312. The parts of Leinster belonging to the Clann Cormaic are all Angebte na Gabla Fine, Cuthraighe, Ua Trena, Ui Cruinn or Ui Cuinn, Ua Gabla Fine and Ua Gabla Roireann. All this comprised the territory from Cúil Caig, or Cingeadh, to Dubh Atha in Maisdin, from Glais Crice in Cluanach Cua to Uada at Laighis and to Ath Lethnocht at Slebhte, till it terminates in the water at Hui Bairrche, in Gebti Ua Trenan, and Ua Chuirc (v. next word), Fir. 450.

             angebthi ui tréna; in Dál Chormaic, in Leinster, Ll. 312, in Leinster, nr. Ui Barirrce and Ui Chuirc, Fir. 450.

 atha lethan; in Luigne Connacht, Con. 10 a; v. Baile Átha Lethain, Fm. iv. 676, 682, 730; A. Lethan a Luighne; A. L. a Luighni; A. L. a Luighne at Baile Á. Leathain, Ballylahan, now in barony Gallen, county Mayo, Lc. i. 354, 402, 404; Annals of Connacht, fo. 10 a, Lc. thrice and Fm. once put Á. Lethan in Luigne (now b. Leyney, c. Sligo); O'Donovan and Hennessy say they were wrong, but were the entries when first penned wrong? In my "Description of Ireland an. 1598," p. 143, a document of 1585 names McJordan Chief Lord of the barony of Bellalahan at Gallen;" it was then in Gallen, Mayo; A. Lethan il Luighnib; d'Exetra tigerna Á. Lethain; Mailir d'Exetra ticcerna Átha L.; Mac Siúrtáin d'Exetra tigerna Á. L.; Caislén A. L.; Mac Siurtain tigerna Baile Á. L., Fm. iii. 348, 510, 514, iv. 676, 682, 731; Mailir d'Eisetra tigerna Á. L.; Mac Siurtan tigerna Baile Á. L., Au. ii. 426, 428, iii. 28; Brian Oh Uigin, head of his sept, Irish and Scotch instructor, died A.D. 1475, and was buried in Á. Lethan, Con. 65 a

Baille. mic murchadha; Ballymacmurragh, in parish Tibohine, barony Frenchpark, county Roscommon, [book of]Lecan. ii. 382, Ci.

             Bhaile an bhiala; Seisreach Bhaile an Bhiala in  BhriaPobalin, Ai. 108 a, Hb. 8 b.

             baile an róisde; the Seisreach Bh. an Róisde in Pobal Bhriain, Ai. 108 a, Hb. 8 a.

             baile fhindachta; in Connacht, Lec. 331.

              baile mhilis; the Leithseisreach B. Mhilis, N. of the Sruth in the Caisleán, in Pobal Bhriain, Ai. 107 b, Hb. 8 a; in c. Limk.; there is a Bally Meelish House 2 m. fr. Borris-in-Ossory.

             baile na mbruthnóg; in Pobal Bhriain, Ai. 108 a; B. na mBruithneóg, Hb. 8 a.

             baile sheágháin; in Pobal Bhriain, Ai. 108 a, Hb. 8 a.

 benn étair meic étgaith; Sas. 4683, 188, 249, Sil. 289; Howth Head. b. fada; also B. Fhota; mainistir Benna fada, Mis. i. 71; B. (fh)oda, Fy. 480, Gc. 207; luid ó Mhainistir Bendfhoda in Luighnibh Connacht, Fm. v. 1852, Caislén an Bhend fada (an. 1265), Caislén an Bennada; don Bheann fada, Lec. i. 454, ii. 260, 506; Benn fhoda; Banada, village (and convent) in barony Leyny, county Sligo, near Tobercurry, Fm. iv. 1162, and Fy. 480, which was Beannoda.

             Carn cachta; Cinfhaelad mac Blaithmaic, rí Clan Chachta, slain in battle by Finnachta, Ll. 185.

             Casán cloinne mic muiris; Ry. 68; r. Cashen, in Clanmaurice. cascaille; al. Cascoill, first name of Eamhain Macha, from the time of the Tuatha Dé Danaán, then Eachras Chuan up to the time of Eochaidh Iolbhuadhoigh, then Druim mór up to the time of the sons of Diothorba, the Fionnachadh was its name when Macha got possession of it, Fir. 579,

             cenel critain; a sept of Ui Maine, Im. 34.[finachta of:]

             cenel faghartaigh; b. Kinelarty, in South Down, Fm. iv. 662, Tp.; v. Cenél Fógartaig, and Duibhtrian; Mac Artan, chief of, Lc. ii. 50. c. failbhe; followers of Brian at Clontarf, K. 171 b.

             cenel mic erca; also Tír Ceara, of Crích mic Earca, in Húib Fiachrach, Bb. 63 a.

cenel mic erca; cath etir Cenel m. Erca & Cenel Feradhaig, Fm. i. 248, Au. i. 98, 276; Ui. puts it near barony Clogher, county Tirone, so do I, as the Cenel m. Erca and Cenel Feradhaig must have been neighbours, as they were at war.

             Cill chúile dumai; Bran mac Muridaigh and his wife were burned in Cill Chuile Dumai in Laigis Chúile by Finachta mac Cellaigh (clearly in Leix; O'D. placed it at Kilcool, county Wicklow), Ll. 39 a, 39 c, 388, Fir. 426, Au. i. 274, Fm. i. 396, Sto. 3 a 2; Murchadh, son of Bran, and his wife Aine were burned in Cill Cuile Dumha in Leinster, Bb. 35 b; Bran Ardcenn (K. of Leinster, Fir.), mac Muiredaigh (of the O Tuathal) and his wife Eithne (Aine, dau. of Domnall Midech, Fir.), burned in Cil Chúile Dumha, Ll. 39 c, 388; Nathfraech, Sacerdos, and the Ara of Brigit, in Cill Cula Dumai, Ll. 353; Coole tls. at Abbeyleix.

             Cil fhinnachta; in Luimneach Finnachta in Huaibh Deaga Móra, I. 108 a, col. 8;

            Kilfinaghta in baronies of Upper and Lower Tulla, county Clare, Pgi. ii. 638, near Limerick.

             Cil finnshneachta; in Pobal Bhriain, Annals Inishfallen. 108 a, Hb. 8 a; cf. Cill. Finnachta.     See Gráig in Pobal Bhriain near Croom, south of Limerick city.

             Cill forga; Findchad Epscop ó Cill Fhorga., Fg. 216; C. Fhorga, C. Earga (q.v.), Fep.; Killarga, barony Dromahaire, Leitrim; Fionnchadh Epsop cille Forga, mesaim gurab é so espucc Fionnchadh ó Cill Arga i mBreifne, Md. 306; O Treabhair Coarb of C. Forga, Fir. 675, Lc. ii. 90.

             Cil arga; Finnchadh of, i mBreifne, Md. 306; = Cell Fhorga, Cell Fhearga, q.v.

             cill laisri; Maelodhar mac Ferrdha-Fearadhaigh a quo Hui Mhaeluidhir C. Laisri, I. 86 b, col. 3; Maelodar of Cland Eachach, from whom are the Hui Maeluidir C. Laisri, Lec. 433, Bb. 104 a; C. Lasrach, Killasser, b. Gallen, c. Mayo, Fy. 484; at Topar Cille Lasrach, Hc. 2, 718.

             Clan connmaigh; between Athlone and town of Roscommon, Fm. v. 1316; Clanconow, also Clanconway on West of river Suck, a branch of the O Finaghtys, Fm. iii. 23, note; Clanconoo, barony Ballymoe, Galway., Township.; on West of the Suck [river], and also East of it in Roscommon., Ci., Kj. ii. 342, Mis. i. 207; Mac Daibhith Burke occupied it, Au. iii. 410, Fir. 806; Crecan in it, Lc. ii. 120; Clan Conmaig, a sub-division of Síl Muiredaig, Tig. Rc. xviii. 159, Lct. 108; O Fionnachtaigh its chief, Lct. 108; Fir. 240; about the river Suck, Fir. 240; between Mag Aoi and Ui Maine; i crích Maine mic Echdach, Ar. 130, 238.

             Clan murchadha; one of the free tribes of Tirconnell, Fen. 356. Clan Murchadha; Ua Finnachta, chief of, Conb. 25 a, Au. ii. 204; al. Clan Fínnachta on East of river Suck, Lc. i. 290, Ch. 220, Ac. 294, Fm. iii. 236.

             Clan murchada;  Clan murthuile; in Roscommon Township; it seems in Mag nAoi.

             Baille mic murchadha; Ballymacmurragh, in parish Tibohine, barony Frenchpark, county Rosc., Lecan. ii. 382, Ci.

             Clan nadsluaig; al. Fir Fhermaighe, Ll. 333, Fir. 309, X. 60; also Fir Erndmaighi; Nadsluagh mac Cairpri Daimairgit, mic Eochach mic Cremhthaind, Bb. 65 a.

 corcortri; Bb. 128 b; in Corand in Connacht, Lec. 349; the Hi Chuind Corcortri iartharaigi, i.e., Luigni, or Tír Luigne, Lec. 226.

corcothri; King of, Bb. 60 a; al. Corca-Firthri, the people of barony Gallen, county Mayo; barony Leyney, barony Corran, county Sligo; v. Ogyg. iii. 69, Au. i. 500; Mobí Clarenech mac Beoaid of Corcothri, of the Luigni Connacht, Ll. 363.

             Dall conaigh; Finnachta [was] slain there, Lec. 53.

             Finn chorad; gs.; St. Finnacta Finncoradh, Bb. 122 b; Finnachta of Síl Cormaic in Leinster i Finnchoraidh, Ll. 351, 390, Lec. 109; in Leinster, [see sil cormaic]

Bb. 78 b; Cellán, Garbán, Connlaegh i Findchoraid, Lb. 17; perhaps Finnaragh in parish Ardagh, county Longford; Fincora near Roscrea (?). f. druim; Findruim; Findrum townland in parish Convoy, barony Raphoe, county Donegal, Mi., Ci.; Fintan of, Lec. 108. From Index Locorum; Ann. Four Masters, Fionnchoradh, Corofin, in Thomond, 1157, see Cora Finne.  Cora finne: in Thomond, 1573, 1599.

             Formael; a hill on the land given by King of Leinster to Dubthach maccu Lugir, Ll. 45 b, where the boundaries and features are described; also Formaoil na bFian, in Hui Chionnsiolaigh, where Luimnioch Laighion now is, K. 147 b 1; .i. Limenagh, otherwise Limericke, Mm. 490; now Limerick or Little Limerick, opposite Sir T. Esmonde's hall-door; Fermoyle and Cooletegart formed on townland. of 310 Irish acres of the Manor of Esmonde, Esmonde MSS.; Cooltegart is well known still.

             Formael; between Senbotha and Abaind in Huibh Cennsellaig, where Fiandachta, King of Connacht, set up his abode, Lbl. 908; same as previous

             gleann finneachta; Glynn parish in NE. of county Down, in Trian Chongail, Fm. iv. 689 note; Dál Riada .i. an Rúta o Bhuais go crois Gleanna, Up. 611.

             gráig; O Briain ó'n nGráig in Pobal Bhriain (?), Ai. 108 b; the Leithseisreach na Graige in Pobal Bhriain, Ai. 108 a, Hb. 8 a; Graigue, upwards of 60 places of this name in Munster, Connacht, and Leinster.; this is Graigue, near Croom, Limerick.

             gnith findachta; in the land of the Cruithni, Z. 174 b.

Note: gnith [gnithi plural] is a medieval pictish given name.  Some say the name Cruithni is the Irish name for the Scottish, possibly Welsh name pictii. Ex. Brude [king] Gnithi a quo Cruithni.

             graig na mbreathnach; named from Welsh colonists in Ireland, Keating 128 a; also Vallis S. Salvatoris, B. lv.; Graiguenamanagh, county Kilkenny gráine; v. Grainne; cath Graine against Finchadh, King of Hui Cheindselaigh, Ll. 182, Bb. 48 a, Hx. 199, K. 158 a; cath Gráinne between Leinster and the King of Ireland, Ll. 300 a; in Ui Ceinnselaig, Lg. 182, Ll. 182, Lec. 138, Z. 468; cath Graine i tír Laigen, Chi., Ui.; Graney in South of county Kildare, near Castledermot, Cri., Ac. 73; in dry. of Omorthi, d. Dublin, Tax.

             Grallach dollaid; Ll. 25 a, Lu. 82; G. Dollaith, Bb. 49 a, Tig. an. 695, I. 25 a, Sil. 402; prob. Girley, near Kells, county Meath, Fia., Au. i. 142 (so O'D. and Hen. guessed); it is at th dá Ferta, Lbl. 608, Tbr. 242, 245; King Finachta slain there by the Lord of Fir Cúla Bregh, Lg. 192; also Amrún Fer nDea, Sa. 88 a; v. Ll. 31, 185, Sa. 88 a, Mi., Chi.; G. Dadlaich, Lec. 619, th da Ferta, Fir Cúla Breg, point to cc. Louth, Armagh and Down, and to Grallagh Greenan tl., the only Grellach in that region; it is in Lr. Iveagh.

 lugni; v. Luighne; were in barony Leyny, county Sligo, N., Ui., Mi., Ci., Cs., B. lxi., iv.; Ua hEgra [O'Hara] rí Lugni, Conb. 2 5 a.

lugni fertri; Lughna F., in Connacht, Fir. 62, Bb. 155, Lec. 388; Luigidh Fertri, Ha. 736.

             Luimnech; also L. Laigen in Ui Cennsalaig, K. 147 b, Ods. 672, Chi.; L. i Laignib, I. 41 a; al. Luimnech Finnachta, Cell Fionnachta Luimnigh in Teach De in Hui Deagha Móra, in Hui Censiolach, Fir. 709, I. 108 a; L. Laigen, also Formaoil na bhfian, K. 147 b (cf. Finn Formáili, Ll. 128 a; Findachta went from Connacht to Formael in Ui Cennselaig, Lbl. 908; he is called Sanctus Luimnigh, Chr. 148; in Fm. and Au. he is called Finshnechta Luibnighe; fiad Luibnide, Lct. 10; "Limenagh, otherwise Limericke, "granted to Sir L. Esmonde in 1618," Mm. 490; now Little Limerick opposite Sir T. Esmonde's halldoor at Ballynastragh, Gorey; a townland and a churchyard on the slope of Limerick hill, which last is, I think, Sliab Luimnig; cf. "All the Mannor of Esmonde and all the lands of Lemenagh and Formoyle," Esmonde MSS., document of date 24 May, 1637.

             Luibnech;  Finsnechta Luibnighe, Lec. 260 b, Annals Ulster i. 354; now Limerick in parish Kilcavan, county Wexford, Hen.; "on borders of ancient Meath and Leinster," O'Don., Fm. i. 474; "Luimnech Fionnachta" infra, supports Hen.'s views.

 sil cormaicc; of Leinster., Sr. 65 a; Seghin and Failbhe of the Sil Cormaic, who occupied Ráith Bilech, Ll. 390; at Ravilly, county Carlow.

sil creide; the O Conors of Connacht buried at Clonmacnois, Pi. i. 5.

 címe; in Connaught; so called from Címe Cheithirceann, a Firbolg, at Loch Címe, Bb. 208 a, Fir. 67, K. 124 a, Lec. 554; cath Cimi gained by Amalgaid, Lbl. 909, Fy. 22, Lec. 162; at Lough Hacket, county Galway.

             tir an mhuine; N. of the r. at Caisleán Bhaile Í Chathain in Pobal Bhriain, county Limerick., Ai. 107, Hb. 8.

             tir an tsneachta; Friesland, St. B. 441; Norway, Sweden, and Jutland, Ai. 22, Hz. 218.

             ui finnachtaigh; of Síl Anmchadha, Im.

             ui dega; descended from Daig mac Enna Cennsélaig (and so in Wexford or Wicklow), Ll. 337 a; in Ui Cennselaig, F., Fg., Md., B. xx., Lec. 393; Ui Deadha, Bran. 152; Ui Deaghaidh, K. 168; Ui Deadhaigh (in Ui Ceinselaigh), baroney Gorey, county Wexford, Township, Fia.; dry. Oday, barony Gorey; in it were Cell Mosilóc, F., Fg., Md., Ros Mór, Md., Fg., F.

             ui dega bic; also Ui Muiredaigh in Leinster, Ll. 312, 383.

            ui dega draignech; in Ossory, Ll. 339.

              ui dega móir laigen; al. Ui Degad M. L., Ll. 284, Lis. 45 a; Ros Mór in it, F.; in Ui Ceinnselaigh, Fir. 709; Luimneach Finnachta, also Cell Finnachta, in it, I. 108 a; at Limerick hill and ch. ruin opposite Sir T. Esmonde's house, barony Gorey; v. Luimnech, Cell Finnsnechta. [this appears to be Finnachta King of Connacht who was fostered in Luimnech.]

             ui degadh osraige; of same race as Ui Degadh Laigen, Fg. xv., O'D. Gram. 459; barony Ida, county Kilkenny, also Ui Dega Tamnaige, q.v.

             ui dega tamnaige; Lec. 455; of Síl Birn or Ossorians, Ll. 339; Rath-downey preserves the name; seems same as Ui Dega Draignech.

             ui dróna; Ll. 353, Lb. 22, B. v., K. 168; bb. Idrone, county Carlow., Fia., Tp., Mi., Mm., Ci., Cri., Ui.; Aed tigerna Ua nDróna na tTrí Maige, tanaise Ua cCeinnselaig, Fm. ii. 574; Ua Ríain was its chief, Bran. 153, F2.

             úi echach; Lis. 19 b, 20 a; O Mahony's l. in b. W. Carbery, c. Cork, Obr., Ui.; ext. fr. Balledehob to Dunmanus Bay, Ac., Mi.; pp. Kilmoe, Scool, Kilcrohane, Durris, Kilmoconnoge and Caheragh, Tp.; v. Ui. E. Muman.

             ui echach; the O Brics of S. Desies, Waterf., Tp.

            ui echach; Úi Eachach of Sliab Breg, Lec. 176.

              ui enechlais; also Ui Enechglais, also Ui Fenechlais, in barony Arklow, c. Wick., N. of Ui Degaid, Lct., Tp., Mi., Cri., Cg.; their pedigree, Sr. 65 a, Lec. 570, Bran. 152 b; i Fortuathaib Laigen, F.; Ui Feneclais, Fg.; in Fotharta Airbre, Fir. 703; al. Ui Enechlais Cualann, in which was Tóchar Inbir Móir (at Arklow), Ll. 9, 15, Bb. 23 a, 172 a, 175 a, Fir. 99, Lg. 77, Sc. 19 a, Mi., Of. 329.

            ui enechlais maige; Ll. 314; in Ui Biarrchi, at Cell Auxilli in Lein., Bb. 74 a, Lec. 198, Fir. 466, 216.

             úi failgi; F2.; descended from Ross Failge, son of Cathir Mór; the chief families are O Conor Failgi, O Demsy and O Duinn, Of. 310; the pl. voc. is Uu Failge! Om. iii. 49; bb. E. and W. Offaly, c. Kild.; bb. Portnahinch and Tinnahinch in Queen's Co., and the part of King's Co. which belongs to d. of Kild. and Leighlin, Tp., Cg., Mis. i. 232; also bb. Upr. and Lr. Philipstown, Geshil, Warrenstown and Coolestown, Fm. iii. 44, Ui.; ext. fr. Sliabh Bloom to the Hill of Allen, and fr. the Sugar-loaf Hills to the Great Heath of Maryborough, O'D., Fm. iv. 955; King's Co. is Conntae Ua bhFailghe, Fm. vi. 2264; in it are - Adarcca Iuchbad, Caislén Edain Daire, Cell Achaid Sinchill, Cell Osnad, Cluain Corcaige, Cluain Ferta Mugaine, Cluain Immorruis, Cluain Mór, Cluain Mór Lithgein, Cluain Sosta, Cruachan Brigh Ele, Cúil bendchuir, Disert Fulartaig, Druim Ferta, Faithche mac Mecnain, Geisille, Glaisse Bulgan, Mag Fea, Mag Geisille, Mag Reicheat, Mag Smeathrach, Oenach Dairen, Ráith Derthaige, Ráith Scanlaige, Tempall Bercháin, Tuath Dá Maige, Ui Bresail, Ui Tairrsig; v. Mi., Ui., Ci., Cri, F., Fg., Md., Mt., Fep., Mr., Ci., Fia., Lh., Sr. 65 a, Pd. 28, Sil., B. v., Ct., Lis. 5 b, 12 a, Tl., Ll. 300 b, Lec. 30.

 

            ui gadhra; also Muinter Madadháin, Im.

            ui gadhra; O Gara clan in Mayo, Fm. ii. 798.

 

            ui garchon; in Leinster, Of. 293; i Fortuathaib Lagen, F2.; Tech na Románach and Cell Fine in it, Lh. 99, Fir. 693; i Fothartaib Lagen, F., Fg., Ct., Md.; in W. Leinster, F2. (leg. E. of Lein.); Drichú, King of Ui Garrchon, rejected St. Patrick at Ráith Inbir, Lb. 27 b, Tl. 186; Ui Garrchon, Lb. 83; in plebe Nathi filii Garchon quae dicitur Ui Garrchon, Up. 813; v. Lec. 115, 194, Bb. 124 a, Tl. lix., B. lviii., lix.; Ui Garbchon, Lh. 160 a; in it are Cell Airnd, Cell Aird, Coill Ard, Dún Grea, Dún Inteing, Glenn Faidble, Ráith Inbir, Ráith Núe, Sliab Airgiall, Tech fleide, Tech na Roman; Rathnew is 1 3/4 m. from Wick. town, Glenealy is 4 m. from it; if Ráith Inbir is at Inber, al. Inber Mór (i.e. Arklow), and if Cell Airnd is Killarney townland, county Wicklow, near Bray, Ui Garchon. extended from Arklow to Bray.

 

ui maeltuili; of Conmaicni Réin, Fen.

 

ui maeluidir; Township in barony of Eliogarty, county Tipperary.

ui maeluidhir; of Cell Laisre, Annals Inishfallen 101 a.

 

ui maic cairthind; I. 136 b, Lis. 143 b, Bb. 150 b; their genealogy, Ll. 325; nr Loch Foyle, Lec. 181, Ll. 333, Of. 362, Lh. 187, X. 58; Ui mac Carthainn, b. Tirkeeran, c. Derry, Tp., Lct., Mi., Ci., Ui.; al. Ui Cormaic, Of. 361.

 

ui maini; F.2; Nepotes Maini, A. 14 a b; v. their genealogy, Ll. 338 d, Sr. 79 a; v. Map of Ui M. in Im.; also diocese of Clonfert, Fep.; al. Trían Uachtarach(?), Im. 62; ancient Úi Maine comprised in county Roscommon baronies Ballymoe, Ballintober S., Athlone and Moycarn; in county Galway, bb. Ballymoe, Tiaquin, Killian, Kilconnell, Clonmacnowen, Longford, Leitrim, Loughrea, and parts of Dunkellin and Athenry; in c. Clare, part of Tulla Upr.; and in King's Co. the p. of Lusmagh, Im.; v. Lec. 349, Lct., Tp., Tl., Mi., Ci., Cri., F., Md., Mt., Mr., Fia., C., Cs., B. i., Lis. 45 a.

 

ui meachair; in barony of Ikerrin, county Tipperary., Township., Rennes MS. 52 a.

ui meachair; of Corcotrí, q.v.; Lec. 226; Ui Meachair, seems near Descert Breg and Dartry, and of Ui M., Bb. 53, Fir. 191.

 

St. Finnacta Finncoradh

 

            Finn chorad; gs.; St. Finnacta Finncoradh, Bb. 122 b; Finnachta of Síl Cormaic in Leinster i Finnchoraidh, Ll. 351, 390, Lec. 109; in Leinster, [see sil cormaic]

 

[ Note:The following references to Finn chorad may or may not apply to St. Finnacta Finncoradh]

Bb. 78 b; Cellán, Garbán, Connlaegh i Findchoraid, Lb. 17; perhaps Finnaragh in parish Ardagh, county Longford; Fincora near Roscrea (?). f. druim; Findruim; Findrum townland in parish Convoy, barony Raphoe, county Donegal, Mi., Ci.; Fintan of, Lec. 108. From Index Locorum; Ann. Four Masters, Fionnchoradh, Corofin, in Thomond, 1157, see Cora Finne.  Cora finne: in Thomond, 1573, 1599.

 sil. cormaicc; of Leinster., Sr. 65 a; Seghin and Failbhe of the Sil Cormaic, who occupied Ráith Bilech, Ll. 390; at Ravilly, county Carlow.

 rath bilech; ds., Raith Bilich, A. 18 a; R. Bilig, Ll. 45 a, 316 b, 351, 390, Bb. 78 b, Lec. 109, 49, 209, Mm. 486, Fir. 726, Lb. 20; the Rath is on East of the village of Ravilly, county Carlow; R. Bile (Bran. 91 b) may be Rathvilla townland in King's Co.

 fid; A. 18 a; the wood of Fid round the ridge of Fid (Druim Feadha), Drumfea in parish Fennagh, barony East Idrone, county Carlow; as I gather from the following texts that Iserninus, al. Bp. Fith, came to the S. part of Ireland, then to his province to a small tribe (aicme bec) in Clíu named Catrige; thence he went and set up at Toicuile, thence to Ráith Foalascich, to Láthrach Da Arad; there Cathboth's 7 sons came to him and were baptised, and he went with them southwards to their abode; they were exiled for their faith, but when Crimthann, son of Énde Ceinnselach, was baptised at Ráith Bilech they were restored to their home; hence are the Féna or Fid (or hence is the name Féna on Fid?); they go to Patrick and Cremthann, son of Énde, at Scí Pátric, and through Patrick they and Bp. Fith get fr. Crimthann, macc Éndi Níi, "dul" under Griein Fothart fr. Gabor Liphi as far as Suide Laigen, and they settle at th Fithot; Patrick went fr. Tara in Lein., and met Dubthach maccu-Lugir at Domnach Már Criathar in Ui Censelich, A. 18 a; it was at the same time that the Deissi went upon Gabran, and (the) Feni on Fid Már, and the Fothart

on Gabran to the E., Laud. 610, fo. 102 a, quoted in Tl. 343; in Idrone are - (1) Clíu (q.v.) reflected in Tullowclay (Tulach Clíach) in p. Fennagh; (2) Catrighe, al. Cotrige, the Corries (Cathrige), Corries Lodge, Corries r., Corrymore Lodge, which implies a Corrybeg (Catrige aicme bec supra), a little S. of Fennagh; (3) Féna is Fenagh, al. Fennagh p., tl., Bridge and Lodge; Fennagh parish is in bb. of East Idrone, Rathvilly (Ráith Bilech supra) and Forth (Fothart supra); (4) Ath Fithot is Aghade tl., p. and Bridge in b. Forth; Epscop Fith of th Fithor (A. 18 a) is Eps. Ith tha Fadat (Ll. 308 b), al. th Fadhad; (5) betw. Aghade and Suide Laigen (Mount Leinster), and also in b. Forth are Kil-graney (Griein Fothart) and Kill-carry (Cell Cat(h)rige), and betw. Aghade and Fennagh is Larah (Láthrach dá Arad?), and N. of Larah is Rath-rush (Ráith-foalascich), where foalascach, gl. arbustum, a shrub, is misrendered juncus, a rush; (6) Tuckmill tl. (Toicuile ?) in Rathbran p. is 10 or 12 m. N. of Ravilly (Ráith Bilech).

             ui dróna; Ll. 353, Lb. 22, B. v., K. 168; bb. Idrone, county Carlow., Fia., Tp., Mi., Mm., Ci., Cri., Ui.; Aed tigerna Ua nDróna na tTrí Maige, tanaise Ua cCeinnselaig, Fm. ii. 574; Ua Ríain was its chief, Bran. 153, F2.

Note:  There is a genealogy of Fiannachtach Hua Droina-Laigen who is related to the Ryans who were Lords of Idrone

Annals of Ireland part II

A.D. 688. It reigned (rained) Blood in Lynster this year; butter was turned into the colour of Blood; and a wolf was seen and heard speak with human voice. At the year 685 the Saxon Chronicle records that a shower of blood fell that year in Britain, and that the milk and butter were moreover turned into blood. Annals of Tighernach At the year 693; blood flowed in streams for three days and three nights.

The Age of Christ, 691. The eighteenth year of Finachta. Becfhola, bishop died.

The Age of Christ, 692. The nineteenth year of Finachta. Cronan Beg, abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois, died on the 6th of April.

The Age of Christ, 693. The twentieth year of Finachta. After Finachta Fleadhach, son of Dunchadh, had been twenty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Aedh, son of Dluthach, son of Ailill, son of Aedh Slaine, chief of Feara-Cul (the barony of Kells in Meath), and Congalach, son of Conaing, son of Congal, son of Aedh Slaine, in a battle at Greallach-Dollaith (2 miles south of the town of Kells, in Meath). Breasal, son of Finachta, also fell in this battle along with his father.

The Age of Christ, 700. The seventh year of Loingseach. Muireadhach of Magh-Ai, King of Connaught, son of Fearghus, from whom are the Sil-Muireadhaigh, died.

Age of Christ, 701.. After Loingseach (154th Monarch), son of Aengus, son of Domhnall, had been eight years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Corann, by Ceallach of Loch Cime [L.Hacket], the son of Raghallach, as Ceallach himself testifies in this quatrain

For his deeds and ambition, on the morning he was slain a Glais-Chuilg;

I wounded Loingseach there with a sword, the monarch of (all) Ireland round.

There was slain also his three sons along with him, Artghal, Connachtach, and

Flann Gearg. There were also slain there the two sons of Colcen, and Dubh-

dibhearg, son of Dunghal, and Fearghus Forcraith, and Conall Gabhra, and

other noblemen besides them. Conall Meann, son of Cairbre, composed these quatrains, and that was the cause of the battle

If Loingseach should come to the Banna, with his thirty hundred about him,

To him would submit, though large his measure, Ceallach the Grey of Loch Cime.

Ceallach of the round stones was well trained; a paling of spears was leaped over By the Redhanded King of Lock Cime.

Note King Loyngseagh the Monarch and his 3 sons were slain in the battle of Corann, the 4th of the Ides of July, the 6th hour of Saturday - Annals of Clonmacnoise.

Corann- A famous territory, now a barony in the county of Sligo. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, par iii. c.69.

Loch Cime This was the ancient name of Lough Hackett, in the parish of Donaghpatrick, barony of Clare, county of Galway. The barony of Clare lies just north of the city of Galway.

From Fheargus, the brother of Ceallach all the O'Connors of Connacht and their co-relatives are descended. Finnachta of Clan Conway, and Finnachta of Clan Murrogh of the Champions were two of the Twelve Lords of Rath Cruaghan, and were co-relatives of the O'Conor Kings of Conacht.

The Age of Christ, 790 (recte' 795). The 24th year of Donnchadh (as 163rd Monarch). Bran-Airdcheann, King of Leinster, and (his wife) Eithne, daughter of Domhnall Midheach, were killed by Finsneachta Ceathairdherc, son of Ceallach, at Cill-cuile-dumha, on the sixth night of summer precisely.

Note Bran Airdcheann or Bran the High-headed. Eithne was daughter of Domhnall Midheach (of Meath, probably the 19th King & 161st Monarch).

The Annals of Ulster give this date as A.D. 794. Domhnall began his reign as monarch in 738, and ruled untill 758. Eithne would have been the sister of Donnchadh, the 163rd Monarch.

The Age of Christ, 793. (recte' 798). The first year of Aedh Oirdhidhe, son of Niall Frosach, in sovereignty over Ireland. The battle of Druim-righ by Aed Oirdnighe, wherein were slain the two sons of Domhnall, Finsheachta and Diarmaid; Finshneachta, son of Follamhan; and many others along with them not enumerated. To commemorate which was said

Though Aedh was slain by Domhnall, a greedy triumph;

By the true fair Aedh it was avenged, in the battle of Druim-righ.

Aedh Oirdnidhe devastated Meath, until it submitted to him. Inis-Padraig was burned by foreigners, and they bore away the shrine of Dochonna; and they also committed depredations between Ireland and Alba (Scotland).

Note Battle of Druim-righ; the King's Ridge or Long Hill, now Drumry or Dromree, near Ratoath, in the county of Meath. The Aedh who was slain by Domhnall was probably Aodh Olann the 160th Mon.

The Age of Christ, 794 (recte' 799). The second year of Aedh Oirdnidhe. Fiannachta, of Fearna, died.

Note Fearna or Ferns in Hy-Kinsealla, Leinster.

and

Ailell, son of Innreachtach, lord of Ui-Maine-Connacht, died.

Note Aillel was the father of Finnachta, and his father was often called Finnrachtach.

and

The battle of Finabhair in Teathbha, by Muireadhach, son of Domhnall, in which many chief were slain along with Fearghus, son of Ailghil, lord of Cinel-Cairbre, with Duibhinnreacht, son of Artghal, with Muireadhach, son of Connmhach, and with Cosgrach, son of Ceithearnach. Note Finabhair is now Fennor in county Westmeath.

Age of Christ, 798 (recte' 803). the sixth year of Aedh. Aengus son of Mugron, king of Ui Fhailgi, was treacherously killed by the followers of Finnechta son of Cellach, at their King's instigation. Note Finnechta King of Leinster.

Age of Christ, 799. (recte'804). Duibhinnreacht, son of Cathal, King of Connaught, died. ....... Aedh Oirdnidhe afterwards went to the King of Leinster, and obtained his full demand from the Leinstermen; and Finsneachta, King of Leinster, gave him hostages and pledges.

Age of Christ, 800 (recte' 805). The eighth year of Aedh Oirdnidhe. Finachta, son of Donnghal, died. Finnshneachta, son of Ceallach, King of Leinster, entered into religion. Aedh Oirdnidhe went to Dun-Cuair, and divided Leinster between the two Muireadhachs, namely, Muireadhach, son of Ruadhrach, and Muireadhach, son of Bran.

Age of Christ, 801, ( 805 Annals of Ulster). Hy-Coluim-Cille was plundered by foreigners; and great numbers of the laity and clergy were killed by them, namely, sixty-eight. tir-da-ghlas (Terryglass) was burned. Finnachta, son of Ceallach, King of Leinster, took the government again.

Age of Christ, 802, (recte' 807). The tenth year of Aedh Oirdnidhe. The church of Coluim-Cille at Ceanannus (Kells, in Meath), was destroyed. Inis-Muireadhaigh (Innishmurry Island, Sligo) was burned by foreigners, and they attacked Ros-Commain.

Age of Christ, 803, (recte' 808. Finshneachta, son of Ceallach, King of Leinster, died at Cilldara (Kildare).

Age of Christ, 810 (recte' 815). Muirgheas, son of Tomaltach (the father of Tadhg Mor, King of Connaught), King of Connaught, died. The plundering of Cluain-creamha, and the slaying within it of some of the men of Breifne, and of the Sil-Cathail.

Note Cluain-creamha is now Clooncraff, situated to the east of Elphin, in the county of Roscommon. Sil-Cathail Clann-Cathail, the race or progeny of Cathal; the name of a sept of the Sil-Muireadhaigh, the chief of whom, after the establishment of surnames, took that of O'Flanagan, seated in the barony and county of Roscommon. Tomaltach was of the Line of Heremon

The Age of Christ, 826. The ninthe year of Conchobhar. A battle was gained over the foreigners by Cairbre, son of Cathal, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh. Muireadhach (26th King), son of Ruadhrach (23rd King), King of Leinster, died.

Age of Christ, 827. The tenth year of Conchobhar. Cearbhall, son of Finnachta, lord of Dealbhna-Beathra, died.

Note Dealbhna-Beathra--Otherwise called Dealbh-na-Eathra. This was the ancient name of the present barony of Garrycastle, in the King's County.

The Age of Christ, 828. The eleventh year of Conchobhar. Finnsneachta, son of Bodhbhchadh, lord of Cinel-Mic-Earca, died.

Note Badhbhchdh, son of Eachtghus, chief of Cinel-Mic-Earca, died, 769.

The Age of Christ, 834. The third year of Niall. Cluain Mic Nois (Clonmacnoise) was profaned by Cathal, son of Ailell, lord of Ui Maine, against the prior, whom he cast into the Sinainn, and killed.

Note It was said that because of the plundering the kingship of the Ui-Maine was transferred from the line of Cathal forever. His brother Finnachta became the next king.

Age of Christ, 844. Cathal, son of Ailell, king of Ui Máine, died.

The Age of Christ, 846. The second year of Maelseachlainn. Finsneachta Luibnighe, son of Tomaltach, King of Connaught, and who was afterwards an anchorite, died.

Note The Roll of the Monarchs make Malachi I the 167th Monarch beginning his reign in A.D. 844 and ending in 860. Malachi I was of the Line of Heremon. Finsneachta Luibnighe i.e. Finsneachta of Luibneach, a place on the borders of ancient Meath and Munster, where it is probable he was fostered.

The Age of Christ, 852. The eighth year of Maelseachlainn. Innreachtach Ua Finachtain, successor of Colum Cille, a distinguished wise man, suffered martyrdom from the Saxons on the twelfth day of March.

Note Innreachtach Ua Finnachta is recorded in the Book of Saints of Iona.

The Age of Christ, 876. Finnsneachta, son of Maelcorcra, lord of Luighne, died.

Note LUIGNE-CONNACHT A people and territory in barony of Leyney, Co. Sligo and surrounding district in Co. Mayo. In the Annals of Ulster as Finnechta son of Mael Corcra, king of the Luigni of Connacht dies [879]. This was a tribe from Cian mac Oilliol Ollum of Munster, descending from Heber, son of Milesius of Spain.

The Age of Christ, 953. The eleventh year of Conghalach. Flann, son of Glethneachan, chief of Clann-Murchada, died.

and …( )…… Muchadh, son of Flann, son of Glethneachan, chief of Clann-Murchada, with a countless number along with them and Murchadh totally plundered Connaught afterwards.+-

Notes from the Onomasticon Goedelicum

Clan murchadha; Ua Finnachta, chief of, Au. ii. 204; also Clan Fínnachta on East of river Suck, Lecan i. 290, Ch. 220, Ac. 294, Fm. iii. 236.

Clan murchada; Clan murthuile; in Roscommon, Township; it seems in Mag nAoi.

Baille. mic murchadha; Ballymacmurragh, in parish Tibohine, barony Frenchpark, county Roscommon, Lecan. ii. 382, Ci.

 

Age of Christ 1094. A battle was gained by Tadhg, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, and the Sil-Muireadhaigh, over the people of Thomond and West Connaught, in which three hundred were slain; and they plundered all West Connaught. This was was called the battle of Fidnacha.

Note This son of Roderick [R.the King of Connaught and Monarch] was called Tadh Fidhnacha, after the territory he conquered in West Connaught.

Age of Christ 1097. Tadhg, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair [mac Toirdhealbhach Mor], lord of Sil-Muireadhaigh, and defender of the province in general, was treacherously killed by the Clann-Conchobhair and his own servant of trust ie. by the son of Culuachra Ua Maelbhrenainn, in the twenty-fourth year of his Age.

Note The Clann Conchobhair were the O'Maelbhrenainns [O'Mulrennin] seated in Baslick parish near Ballintober, county Roscommon.

Age of Christ, 1135. Maelisa Ua Finnachta (Fionnacta), comharba of Ros-Commain, died.

Note This Finnachta was probably a bishop or erenagh of the Siol Muireadhach, and from Clan Conway or Clan Murrogh.

Age of Christ, 1140. A conference was held at Ath-Luain, by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn and Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhar, and they took mutual oaths, and made mutual armistice, and parted in peace. Another wicker bridge was made by Toridhealbhach across At-Luain (Shannon River), and he devastated the west of Meath. A predatory excursion was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and he plundered Muintir-Mael-tSinna. The men of Teathbha made a fierce attack upon his forces, and made a slaughter of them, together with Muireadhach, the grandson of Muireadhach Ua Finnachtaigh, chief of Clann-Murchadha, and the grandson of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri.

Note This was in the reign of Tirloch Mor O'Conor, K. of Connacht for 50 years, and 181st Monarch from 1136-1156. Murcadh Ua Maeleachlainn, was probably Murcha, the last King of Meath, who died in 1172. Ruadhri, was the son of Tirloch Mor, and would become the King of Connacht and 183rd Monarch of Ireland.

The Age of Christ, 1155. Fearghal Ua Finachta, a noble priest of Ross-Commain, died.

The Age of Christ, 1176. A ballybetagh was granted in perpetuity by Roderic O'Conor, King of Ireland, viz. the town land of Toomaghy to God and St. Berach. The following were the sureties of that perpetual gift Keyly (Catholicus) O'Duffy, Archbishop of Tuam; Aireaghtagh O'Rodiv; Flann O'Finnaghty (ua fionnachta); Hugh O'Flynn; Rourke O'Mulrenin; Ignatius O'Monahan; Gilla-an-choimhdhe Mac-an-leastair; O'Hanly; and Conor MacDermot; who were to guarantee that this town land was to remain for ever the property of God and St. Berach, from O'Conor and his representative.

Note This place is Termonbarry in Cluain-Coirpthe, near the Shannon in the east of county Roscommon.

The Age of Christ, 1189. Conor Moinmoy (son of Roderick), King of all Connaught, both English and Irish, was killed by a party of his own people and tribe; i.e. by Manus (Magnus), the son of Flann O'Finaghty (usually called an Crossach Donn); Hugh, son of Brian Breifneach, the son of Turlough O'Conor; Murtough, son of Cathal, son of Dermot, the son of Teige; and Gill-na-naev, the son of Gill-Coman, who was the son of Murray Bane (the Fair) O'Mulvihil of the Tuathas.

Note It is said that Conor Moinmoy was killed by his minions, on his brother's advice. Crossach Donn [O'Finaghta] probably means Manus' face was cross-hatched with brown scars.

and

Conor, grandson of Dermot, was slain by Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy, in revenge of the death (murder) of his father.

Note This Conor was probably a brother of Murtogh, one of the assassins.

The Age of Christ, 1194. Sitric, the son of Flann (Floinn) O'Finnaghty , Chief of Clann-Murrough (cloinne murchada), died.

The Age of Christ, 1225. The sons of Roderick joined O'Flaherty and their other allies and proceeded southwards to Druim-Ceanannain; but Hugh the son of Cathal Crovderg, with his English, set out after them. The tribes who supported the sons of Roderic now held a consultation, and came to the resolution that each of them should return to his own residence, which all accordingly did, excepting Donn Oge Mageraghty; and the princes, i.e. the sons of Roderic, being thus left with only a small force, went to Hugh O'Neill, accompanied by Donn Mageraghty

Note Mageraghty had been Chief of the Sil Murry and was married to the daughter of O'Flaherty, the Prince of West Connaught. O'Neill's wife was the sister of the sons of Roderick [his daughter].

Teige O'Finaghty, one of the officers (Aes graidh) of Hugh, the son of Roderic, was slain by the people of Mac Egan during the same war.

Murray O'Finaghty, Chief of Clann-Murrough, died in a vessel on Lough Oirbsen (Lough Corrib), which he had gone into in good health.

The Age of Christ, 1232. The castle of Bungalvy was erected by Rickard de Burgo (son of William), and the erection of the castle of Dunamon was commenced by Adam Staunton.

Note Bungalvy the mouth of the river Galway. Dunamon, Dun Iomguin. Iomguin; a man's name. Originally the residence of O'Finaghty.

The Age of Christ, 1233. An army was led by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, into Connaught, and Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh (Lord of Moylurg/MacDermott), went to meet him and brought him with him into Moylurg. ........ The resolution they adopted was to go in pursuit of Hugh, King of Conaught, and the other sons of Roderic. On overtaking them they attacked and defeated Hugh, the son of Roderic, slew himself and his brother, Hugh Muimhneach, his son, Donough More, the son of Dermot, who was son of Roderic (O'Conor), and many others besides them. ............ The kingdom and government of Connaught was on that day taken from the sons of Roderic, the son of Turlough. After this Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, assumed the government of Connaught, and demolished the castles which had been erected by the power of the sons of Roderic O'Conor, and the son of William Burke (Richard), namely, the castle of Bungalvy, Castle-Kirk, and Castle-na-Cally, and the castle of Dunamon.

Note It is stated in the Annals of Kilronan, that this Hugh (Aed) was King of Connaught for five years, and that he was the last of the descendants of Roderic that was King of Connaught; that the Pope offered Roderic, and his issue, for ever, the title to the sovereignty, and six married wives, if he would thenceforward abstain from the sin of the women; that Roderic did not accept of this offer on such conditions; and, as he did not, that God deprived him and his race for ever of reign and sovereignty, in revenge of the sin of concupiscence.

Castle Kirk; now called Hen's Castle; its ruins are still on a rocky island, in the northwest part of Lough Corrib. Caislen-na-Caillighe; now called the Hag's Castle, stands on an artificial island in Lough Mask.

The Age of Christ, 1269. Hugh O'Finaghty (Aed ua Fionnacta), a learned minstrel, died.

The Age of Christ, 1289. Simon O'Finnaghty (Siomon ua finnacta), Erenagh of Elphin, died.

The Age of Christ, 1309. Mac William (Burke) then proceeded northwards, across the Curlieu Mountains, and drove Rory, the son of Cathal, from his fortress. On this occasion Donough O'Finnaghty and many others were slain by the ban of Mac William's army.

The Age of Christ, 1326. Laurence O'Laughtnan, Bishop of Elphin, died; and John O'Finnaghty (Seon o'fionnacta) was elected his successor in the bishopric.

The Age of Christ, 1350. Brian Mac Dermot, materies of a lord of Moylurg, was accidentally slain at Roscommon with one shot of a javelin by the people of Bishop O'Finaghty ; and the man who was charged with having cast the dart (Rory-an-t-Seomra O'Donohoe), was immediately mangled as an eric (retaliation) for him (Brian).

The Age of Christ, 1354. John O'Finaghty (Seaan ua finacta), Bishop of Elphin, died.

The Age of Christ, 1360. Tuathal O'Finnaghty (ua fionacta), died.

The Age of Christ, 1361. Nicholas O'Finnaghty (Niocol O'fionacta) died. Magrath O'Finnaghty (Mac Rait Find), (poet) Chief Musician and Tympanist to the Sil-Murray, died.

The Age of Christ, 1530. He (O'Donnell) destroyed and devastated by fire the territory of Clann-Conway; he also burned Glinsce and Cill-Cruain, the towns (castles) of Macdavid; and he obtained great spoil in these countries.

Note Glinsce, now Glinske, a town land containing the ruins of a beautiful castle, in the parish of Ballynakill, barony of Ballymoe, and county of Galway.

Cill-Cruain, now Kilcrone, an old church giving name to a townland and parish in the barony of Ballymoe. The castle of Kilcrone stood near the high road, a short distance to the west of the old church of Kilcrone. It is said to have been the residence of a celebrated heroine called Nuala-na-meadoige Ny-finaghty, the mother of David Burke, the ancestor of Mac David Burke of Glinske. The founder of this family was Sir David, the son of Rickard Finn, by Nuala, the daughter of O'Finaghty, through whose knight service to King Roderich, some say treachery, he obtained the territory of Clann-Conway, which was O'Finaghty's country.